News & Information

The Texas Chiropractic eSource is your connection to Texas Chiropractic news, updates and events and is emailed to members on a bi-weekly basis.

If there is news that you believe needs to be shared with the profession please send the news, or a link to the news to [email protected]

 
TBCE January 31, 2019 Meeting
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 06:46 PM

The Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners will meet on Thursday, January 31, beginning at 9:00 AM at the William P. Hobby Building at 333 Guadalupe, Tower 2, Room 400A, in Austin.

On the agenda for the meeting are:

  • Approval of the minutes of the Nov. 8, 2018 Meeting.
  • Presentation of the board president’s report.
  • Discussion and possible action regarding election of a board vice president and a secretary/treasurer.
  • Presentation of staff reports.
  • Presentation of board committee reports.
  • Public comment.
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DCs Step Up as Radiation Emergency Screeners
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 06:20 PM

It is only a matter of time before a device with real or suspected radioactivity could be employed.  in addition, radiological material is often transported via train or highway, with the potential of an accidental spillage.

Despite the fact that such an occurrence would truly impact a limited number of people, there will be a large segment of the population that will need or wish to be screened for exposure. 

In an ideal response after a radiological “event” of some kind, there should be a designated location for the obviously exposed individuals to gather for evaluation, decontamination and treatment.  There should also be separate locations where those who are concerned, but were not in the immediate vicinity of the incident, can go for screening and education.   DCs in Arkansas have stepped up to help fill this niche.

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Effect of Chiropractic on Reaction Time of Special Operations Forces Military Personnel
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 05:53 PM

Chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) has been shown to improve reaction time in some clinical studies. Slight changes in reaction time can be critical for military personnel, such as special operation forces (SOF). This trial was conducted to test whether CMT could lead to improved reaction and response time in combat-ready SOF-qualified personnel reporting little or no pain.

This prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, KY, USA. Active-duty US military participants over the age of 19 years carrying an SOF designation were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated to CMT or wait-list control. One group received four CMT treatments while the other received no treatment within the 2-week trial period. One hundred and seventy-five SOF-qualified personnel were screened for eligibility; 120 participants were enrolled, with 60 randomly allocated to each group. 

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When Medicine Makes People Sicker
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 05:42 PM

Since the start of 2013, pharmaceutical companies based in the U.S. or abroad have recalled about 8,000 medicines, comprising billions of tablets, bottles, and vials that have entered the U.S. drug supply and made their way to patients' medicine cabinets, hospital supply closets, and IV drips. The recalls represent a fraction of the medicines shipped each year. But the flawed products contained everything from dangerous bacteria or tiny glass particles to mold -- or too much or too little of the drug's active ingredient.

Over the same period, 65 drug-making facilities recalled nearly 300 products within 12 months of passing a Food and Drug Administration inspection.  Those recalls included nearly 37,000 generic Abilify tablets that were "superpotent," and nearly 12,000 boxes of generic Aleve (naproxen) that were actually ibuprofen, according to the recall data.

Just how often people are sickened or die from tainted drugs is next to impossible to determine. No government agency tracks cases unless they're linked to a major outbreak among hospital patients. And sudden, seemingly random illnesses in disparate places are notoriously hard to link to a tainted drug. That’s in part because drugmakers don't have to divulge which products are made in which manufacturing plants, since that is regarded as proprietary information.  The result: Even someone who buys drugs for a major hospital can’t track down where a potentially dangerous product came from.

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