Clinical & Research
Vertical Posture and Head Stability in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain
Written by Editor   
Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: This study demonstrates that patients with chronic neck pain show larger sway and have greater difficulty with more challenging balance tasks.  Postural performance is a reflection of different degrees of disturbances of the proprioceptive input into the central nervous system. 

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Subjective Mental Workload and Its Correlation With Musculoskeletal Disorders in Bank Staff
Written by Editor   
Friday, November 25, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: Subjective mental workload appears to be a risk factor in the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD).  Odds for MSD increased by 11% for each 1 point increase in subjective mental workload score.

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An Updated Overview of Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Non-specific Low Back Pain in Primary Care
Written by Editor   
Thursday, November 24, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: Evidence-based clinical guidelines for low back pain have been issued in many countries.  This review  of national and international guidelines points out the disparities between guidelines.  However, the comparison of international clinical guidelines for the management of low back pain showed that diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations are generally similar.

Consistently, guidelines recommended the early and gradual activation of patients, the discouragement of prescribed bed rest and the recognition of psychosocial factors as risk factors for chronicity.  For chronic low back pain, supervised exercises, cognitive behavioral therapy and multidisciplinary treatment. There are some discrepancies, however, for recommendations regarding spinal manipulation and drug treatment for acute and chronic low back pain. 

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Knowingly Taking a Placebo May Decrease Chronic Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, November 23, 2016 12:00 AM
News Bite: The use of open-label placebo in chronic low back pain patients has been demonstrated to result in significant reductions in pain and improvement of disability after three weeks.  Placebo pills, even with the patient's knowledge of the placebo, may be a useful addition to the treatment of chronic low back pain.  
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Physical Exercise May Improve Depression in Teens
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, November 22, 2016 12:00 AM

 News Bite:  In this era of increased depression teen depression effects about 20% of teens.  Physical exercise can be helpful in improving symptoms of depression in adolescents.  Group-based and supervised light- or moderate-intensity exercise activities 3 times a week for a period of between 6 to 11 or 12 weeks is suggested in this study.

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Mechanisms of Low Back Pain: A Guide for Diagnosis and Therapy
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, November 22, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: The most common musculoskeletal condition affecting 84% of adults is low back pain.  Chronic low back pain (CLBP), has well defined pathological causes and is more than a persistent symptomology.  CLBP has increased 100% in the last decade and continues to increase.  The diagnostic evaluation for CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex decision making.  

The notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistakenly perpetuated across decades. In most cases. Low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generators  each with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity.  The article referenced here discuses radicular pain, facet joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain, offering a simple guidance to identify pain generators.

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Nutritional Supplementation with Calcium Safe From CVD Standpoint
Written by Editor   
Sunday, November 20, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite:  Dietary and supplemental calcium are safe for cardiovascular health when consumed in recommended amounts of up to 2500 mg/day.  Dietary calcium should be preferred over supplements because of increase in kidney stone formation.

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Headache Tied to Hypothyroid Risk
Written by Editor   
Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: Headache disorders may be associated with risk for hypothyroidism.  There should be a high index of suspicion in the setting of typical symptoms such as weight gain, tiredness, cold intolerance, and constipation.

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Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain: A Joint Clinical Practice Guideline
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12:44 PM

News Bite:  Low back pain is the fifth most common reason for all physician visits in the United States.  The stats reported here demonstrate the severity of the issue.  This article also provides seven recommendations for managing low back pain.

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On The Origin of Atraumatic Neuromusculoskeletal Pain
Written by Editor   
Saturday, November 12, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to examine the possible origins of non-specific or atraumatic back pain by applying the Gate Theory of pain and current physiologic concepts. This study presents a theory that accounts for the initiation and potential consequences of neuromusculoskeletal pain incorporating failure of the mechanism of muscle relaxation and resulting in pain and compromise of the lymphatic system. The theory provides an alternative to current theories and hypotheses of the cause and consequences of neuromusculoskeletal pain.

The incidence of low back and other neuromusculoskeletal pain continues to increase, with low back pain being the leading cause of disability in the world.  In addition to the loss of quality of life for those experiencing musculoskeletal pain, the cost to both patients and society is significant and increasing:

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Chiropractic Spinal Manipulative Therapy For Migraine
Written by Editor   
Thursday, November 10, 2016 04:00 PM

The socio-economic costs of migraine are enormous due to its high prevalence and disability during attacks. Acute pharmacological treatment is usually the first treatment option for migraine in adults. Migraine prophylactic treatment is often pharmacological, but manual therapy is not unusual, especially if pharmacological treatment fails or if the patient wishes to avoid medicine. Research has suggested that spinal manipulative therapy may stimulate neural inhibitory systems at different spinal cord levels because it might activate various central descending inhibitory pathways.

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Neck Fractures May Be Lethal in Spine Disease
Written by Editor   
Thursday, November 10, 2016 04:00 PM

Cervical spine fracture was associated with a high mortality risk among hospitalized patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), analysis of data from a national U.S. sample found.

Cervical spine fracture with spinal cord injury had the highest risk of death from any cause in these patients. Even without accompanying spinal cord injury, cervical spine fracture remained significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.  “The high rate of mortality in AS after cervical spine fracture highlights the importance of prompt and specialized care for these patients,” the authors wrote.

Studies have suggested that mortality rates are increased among patients with AS, but the specific causes of death have been unclear. Cervical spine fractures are a recognized complication of AS, and the estimated lifetime risk for vertebral fracture in these patients is 14%. One study reported mortality rates following hospitalization for spinal fracture among patients with AS to be 6.4% to 11.3%.

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Mobilization and Manipulation of the Cervical Spine in Patients with Cervicogenic Headache
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 12:00 AM

It has been estimated that 4.1% of the population may experience cervicogenic headache (CEH).  CEH is one of the more common types of headache and may account for 0.4–15% of the headache population and up to 15–20% of all chronic and recurrent headaches.  Cervicogenic headache was originally described as a unique disorder in 1983 and differentiated from other forms of headaches, such as migraine, that may present with some common symptoms.  The International Headache Society (IHS) issued its initial International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) in 1988.  The current ICHD III beta version classifies CEH as a secondary headache arising from musculoskeletal disorders in the cervical spine and is frequently accompanied by neck pain.

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Two Soft Drinks a Day 'Doubles Diabetes Risk'
Written by Editor   
Saturday, November 05, 2016 12:00 AM

Drinking more than 2 soft drinks a day doubles the risk of developing two types of diabetes.  Researchers say this applies to soft drinks that are artificially sweetened as well as those containing sugar.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the condition in which a person’s blood sugar (glucose) levels become too high because their body can't produce or use insulin properly.  Type 1 diabetes is less common and occurs when special cells in the pancreas are mistakenly destroyed by the body's immune system, meaning that insulin can't be produced. This autoimmune disease usually starts in childhood.

There is, though, a third type of diabetes called Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood (LADA). It shares some of the characteristics of type 1 and some of the characteristics of type 2 – and for that reason it is sometimes referred to as type 1.5 diabetes.  It is estimated that LADA is found in between 6% and 10% of diabetes cases. However, this may be as high as 25% of cases in people diagnosed with diabetes under the age of 35.  The latest study examined the effect of drinking sugary or artificially sweetened drinks on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes or LADA.

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Obesity May Increase Cognitive Decline via Inflammation
Written by Editor   
Friday, November 04, 2016 03:00 PM

Being overweight or obese leads to clinically meaningful increases in the rate of cognitive decline in association with changes in inflammatory markers in the blood, a new analysis of longitudinal data suggests.

The results, which indicate that an increased body mass index (BMI) may accelerate cognitive decline by several months via increases in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, may help explain those of previous studies that link obesity with poorer brain health.

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Tai Chi Resembles Drugs, Aerobics in Blood Pressure Lowering
Written by Editor   
Sunday, October 30, 2016 12:00 AM

Tai chi can lower blood pressure in older people as effectively as drugs or aerobic exercise, a new meta-analysis suggests.

The traditional Chinese discipline offers possibilities for older people who can’t or don’t want to exercise strenuously. “Tai chi is low intensity, it’s social, and this modality would be very attractive to older adults." And tai chi can provide other benefits, such as improved balance.

The SPRINT trial recently showed that people 75 years and older with hypertension benefit when target systolic blood pressure is 120 mm Hg, which is lower than current guidelines.  But antihypertensive drugs can cause adverse reactions and aerobic exercise can be difficult or uncomfortable, especially for people with comorbidities, such as osteoarthritis.

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New AAP Guidance on Avoiding Teen Obesity, Eating Disorders
Written by Editor   
Saturday, October 29, 2016 12:00 AM

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued new evidence-based guidance for healthcare providers on how to help teenagers avoid obesity and eating disorders. The report focuses on parental involvement in promoting healthy eating and exercise, rather than unhealthy weight control efforts.

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Daily Yogurt Consumption Leads to Better Bone Health
Written by Editor   
Saturday, October 29, 2016 12:00 AM

Healthy postmenopausal women who eat at least one serving of yogurt a day have a lower body mass index (BMI), less fat, and better bone density — at least at some skeletal sites — than women who never consume yogurt, new research shows.  Over time, women who ate yogurt also had less cortical bone loss than women who never ate it, and this was independent of any other factor that could account for differences in bone density, such as physical activity and total calcium intake.  The data suggest that there is a possible protective effect of fermented dairy products on postmenopausal cortical bone loss.

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As FT4 Levels Rise, so Does Sudden Cardiac Death
Written by Editor   
Friday, October 28, 2016 12:00 AM

Thyroid dysfunction, particularly high levels of FT4, was associated with an increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a new study.

After an average follow-up period of about 9 years, high levels of FT4 were linked with both a higher relative and absolute risk of SCD.  A higher risk of SCD was also identified even in participants whose FT4 levels were at the high end of normal.  Overall, participants whose FT4 levels at the top of the normal range had approximately a 2.5 times greater mortality rate due to SCD, compared to those at the low end of the normal range.

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Evidence-based Practice, Research Utilization, and Knowledge Translation in Chiropractic
Written by Editor   
Friday, October 28, 2016 12:00 AM

Evidence-based practice (EBP) gaps are widespread across health disciplines. Understanding factors supporting the uptake of evidence can inform the design of strategies to narrow these EBP gaps. Although research utilization (RU) and the factors associated with EBP have been reported in several health disciplines, to date this area has not been reviewed comprehensively in the chiropractic profession. The purpose of this review was to report on the current state of knowledge on EBP, RU, and knowledge translation (KT) in chiropractic.

Findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors hold favourable attitudes and beliefs toward EBP. However, much remains to be done for chiropractors to routinely apply evidence into clinical practice. Educational strategies aimed at practicing chiropractors can lead to more EBP and improved patient care. The chiropractic profession requires more robust dissemination and implementation research to improve guideline adherence and patient health outcomes.

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Hugs, Not Drugs
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 12:00 AM

Non-pharmacologic strategies and tactics to ease a child’s pain may help expedite treatment and improve care in this challenging population.  With both increased pressure to decrease waiting times in the ED and minimize the use of pharmacologic therapies due to the opioid abuse crisis, providers have been forced to get creative.  This may mean turning to certain behavioral and physical/sensorial forms of pain control for children -- everything from how a child is seated to offering electronic games and toys for distraction.

Clinicians were advised to perform a comprehensive assessment, including a physical exam and history as well as the child's developmental stage in order to better target these interventions. The provider should also take note of the family dynamics and identify available resources in the hospital that might be able to help the child.

Strategies to help reduce a child's pain may include:

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Diet and Exercise Can Affect the Brain 'at the Molecular Level'
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 12:00 AM

Modifiable risk factors, such as exercise and consuming a Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet), can reduce amyloid plaque in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), lowering their risk for conversion to Alzheimer's disease, suggests new imaging research.

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Rare Neuropathic Pain Patients Benefit from Complementary Medicine
Written by Editor   
Monday, October 24, 2016 04:48 PM

Certain neuropathic pain disorders associated with a prior surgery may be challenging for clinicians to treat.  While post-mastectomy pain syndrome, post-thoracotomy pain syndrome and post-inguinal hernia pain syndrome may be unusual for primary care physicians, these chronic conditions are not uncommon after these surgeries.  ”I think a lot of you have to deal with these patients who come in and you don't know what the heck to do." said one MD.

Post-mastectomy syndrome is thought to affect anywhere from 15% to 25% of patients undergoing a mastectomy. The population is generally younger women in their 30s. This is the best studied condition out of these three examined syndromes due to the high volume of cases, high burden on society, and the desire to prevent chronic pain in young patients.  Lymph node dissection may increase the risk for post-mastectomy pain syndrome, as it is thought to be linked to damage to nerves in the armpits and chest.

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Vitamin D Supplements May Combat Asthma
Written by Editor   
Monday, October 24, 2016 04:44 PM

A Cochrane Review suggests that patients with asthma who take vitamin D supplements can reduce the number and severity of attacks.  In nine trials administration of vitamin D reduced the rate of exacerbations by 37%, and the risk of having at least one exacerbation requiring an emergency department visit was reduced 61%.

Vitamin D is likely to prevent severe asthma exacerbation and reduce healthcare use by people with asthma.

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Spinal Manipulation Vs Sham Manipulation for Nonspecific Low Back Pain:
Written by Editor   
Monday, October 17, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this systematic review was to identify and critically evaluate randomized controlled trials of spinal manipulation (SM) vs sham manipulation in the treatment of nonspecific low back pain.

There is some evidence that SM has specific treatment effects and is more effective at reducing nonspecific low back pain when compared with an effective sham intervention. However, given the small number of studies included in this analysis, we should be cautious of making strong inferences based on these results.

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Chiropractic Management of Musculoskeletal Symptoms in a 14-Year-Old Hockey Player With Postconcussion Symptoms: A Case Report
Written by Editor   
Sunday, October 16, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study is to describe the chiropractic management of a student athlete with postconcussion syndrome.

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Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 12:00 AM

Work disability is a major personal, financial and public health burden. Predicting future work success is a major focus of research.  To identify common prognostic factors for return-to-work across different health and injury conditions and to describe their association with return-to-work outcomes, Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the grey literature were searched. Systematic reviews addressing return-to-work in various conditions and injuries were selected. Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to identify low risk of bias.             

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Neck Pain In Children
Written by Editor   
Monday, October 10, 2016 12:00 PM

Spinal pain in the pediatric population is a significant health issue, with an increasing prevalence as they age, 52% of pediatric patients report musculoskeletal (MSK) symptoms over a one-year period. Pediatric patients attend for chiropractic care for spinal pain, yet, there is a paucity of quality evidence to guide the practitioner with respect to appropriate care planning.

Neck pain is the most common spinal pain in pediatric patients with 60% reporting neck pain persisting at two years after this study began. Children with neck pain seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions, of which the most common is chiropractic care. Pediatric patients comprise between about 8% and 13% of a chiropractor’s practice. A recent National Institute of Health report suggested that 3.3% of children in the United States (1.9 million) saw a chiropractor or osteopath between 2002 and 2007. Although surveys report pediatric patients visit chiropractors, little is known why they visit, how often, and whether or not there is a favourable response.

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Survey Finds Many People Lack NSAID Knowledge
Written by Editor   
Sunday, October 09, 2016 12:00 AM

About half of the responders to a small online survey said they didn’t know what an NSAID was, nor did they know why they are used.  Overall, 47% of survey respondents, as well as 40% of those who said they had taken pain medication in the last 12 months, said that said they did not know what NSAIDs were.  In addition, more than a quarter said that they were not aware of the FDA recommendations regarding NSAID use (the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration).

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Stop Giving Codeine to Children
Written by Editor   
Sunday, October 09, 2016 12:00 AM

Healthcare providers and parents should stop giving codeine to children, according to a new clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics.  The authors also call for formal restriction of its use in children.

Despite a growing body of evidence that codeine can cause a life-threatening or fatal breathing reaction in children, the authors note that the drug is still available in over-the-counter cough formulas in 28 states and the District of Columbia, as well as by prescription in all states. One recent study, cited in the report, found that more than 800,000 children younger than 11 years received prescriptions for the medication between 2007 and 2011.

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Preventing Food Allergies May Start in Infancy
Written by Editor   
Saturday, October 08, 2016 12:00 AM

Early introduction of certain allergenic foods to the infant diet reduces the risk of developing an allergy to that food. The results indicated with moderate certainty that early introduction of peanuts (from 4-11 months) diminished the risk of subsequent peanut allergy compared with later introduction.  Similarly, for eggs, early introduction (from 4-6 months) cut the risk of developing egg allergy.

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Prenatal Ultrasound Tied to Autism Severity in At-Risk Kids
Written by Editor   
Saturday, October 08, 2016 12:00 AM

Early prenatal diagnostic ultrasound has been linked to variability in symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children with specific genetic vulnerabilities.  These results “add weight to ongoing concerns" expressed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about the nonmedical use of diagnostic ultrasound during pregnancy.

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Low Back Pain Prevalence and Related Workplace Psychosocial Risk Factors
Written by Editor   
Friday, October 07, 2016 12:00 AM

Low back pain is a common health problem in the workplace, and most workers are expected to experience symptoms of low back pain during their working life.  Total costs of direct medical expenditures and loss of work productivity combined related to pain, including low back pain, have been estimated to be as high as $635 billion annually in the United States. 

This population-based study reported that the prevalence of self-reported low back pain in the previous three months among workers in the United States was 25.7% in 2010. Female or older workers were at increased risk of experiencing low back pain. Work-family imbalance, exposure to a hostile work environment, and job insecurity were associated with low back pain after adjusting for different demographic, socioeconomic, and occupational factors. Among all male workers’ occupations, health care practitioners had the highest risk for low back pain, whereas among female workers, farming, fishing, and forestry occupations had the highest risk. Long work hours (41-45 hours) were associated with an increased risk of low back pain. In particular, younger workers working for ≥60 hours and female workers working for 41 to 45 hours were associated with increased reporting of low back pain.

Considerable research conducted on this topic in the past three decades has identified a number of demographic, behavioral, and health- and work-related factors associated with low back pain.  The two major categories of work-related risk factors for low back pain are physical and psychosocial.
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Reliability and Accuracy of Static Parameters Obtained From Ink and Pressure Platform Footprints
Written by Editor   
Thursday, October 06, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and the intrarater reliability of arch angle (AA), Staheli Index (SI), and Chippaux-Smirak Index (CSI) obtained from ink and pressure platform footprints.  Our study revealed that AA, SI, and CSI were similar regardless of whether the ink or pressure platform method was used. In addition, the parameters indicated high intrarater reliability and were reproducible.

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Concussion Doesn’t Slow Kids’ Return to Soccer
Written by Editor   
Sunday, October 02, 2016 12:00 AM

In the U.S., the youngest football players are more likely to return to play less than 24 hours after a concussion than their older peers, researchers found.

In a study that assessed 1,429 concussions, kids on a youth team were six times more likely to be back in the game within a day than high school athletes.  About 16% of concussions resulted in return-to-play at least 30 days after the injury, and 3.1% resulted in return-to-play less than 24 hours after injury.  The most commonly reported symptoms were headache (94.3%), dizziness (75%), and difficulty concentrating (60.5%).

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Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture
Written by Editor   
Saturday, October 01, 2016 07:40 AM

The objective of this study was to describe chiropractic and acupuncture care of a patient with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) symptoms.

A 31-year-old woman had acute neck pain, headache, dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, difficulty concentrating, and fatigue following a fall. She was diagnosed at an urgent care facility with mTBI immediately following the fall. Pharmaceutical intervention had been ineffective for her symptoms.

The patient was treated with chiropractic adjustments characterized as high velocity, low amplitude thrusts directed to the cervical spine and local acupuncture points in the cervical and cranial regions. The patient received care for a total of 8 visits over 2.5 weeks with resolution of concussive symptoms.

This patient with mTBI responded favorably to a conservative treatment protocol with the combination of chiropractic and acupuncture care.

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Orthopedic Surgeries in Psoriatic Arthritis Increasing
Written by Editor   
Thursday, September 29, 2016 12:00 AM

Orthopedic surgical procedures are performed far more commonly today among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) than in the past.  A total of 48.3% underwent at least one orthopedic surgical procedure, with a mean disease duration at the time of surgery of 1.58 years.  In contrast, in a study published in 1998, only 7% of patients with PsA had surgery to restore joint function, and after a mean disease duration of 13.9 years.

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Higher Risk for Kidney Stones in Ankylosing Spondylitis
Written by Editor   
Saturday, September 24, 2016 12:00 AM

Patients with ankylosing spondylitis were at an increased risk of developing kidney stones, Taiwanese researchers found.

In a population-based cohort study, newly diagnosed nephrolithiasis was found to be 19% more common in patients with ankylosing spondylitis compared with individuals without the disease.

The majority of kidney stones contain calcium, and patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis have been shown to have altered calcium and vitamin D metabolism. They also have an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease, which can elevate their absorption of calcium and oxalate. Further contributing to the risk of nephrolithiasis is their use of anti-inflammatory drugs and immobilization

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For 65 and Older, Moderate Physical Activity Reduces CVD Risks
Written by Editor   
Friday, September 23, 2016 12:00 AM

Individuals who are 65 years old and older can help to reduce their risk of cardiovascular death and heart attack by maintaining or beginning moderate physical activity, according to new research.

If you practice moderate exercise, you’re bracing for reducing heart events by 31% said researchers. The potential reduction is greater than 50% for cardiovascular death.

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Spotting Thyroid Issues in Kids
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 12:00 AM

A new review article covers the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of thyroid disorders in children and teens.  The article is intended to be a one-stop evidence-based review of pediatric thyroid diseases commonly seen in primary care. It covers hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, thyroid nodules, and thyroid cancer and provides tools for evaluating these disorders.

An understanding of the risk factors, signs and symptoms, as well as the evaluation and treatment of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, is associated with earlier diagnosis, earlier initiation of treatment, and reduced morbidity from disease.  The authors included information from 83 articles identified through a literature search and published between January 2010 and December 2015, along with some earlier articles of historical interest.

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Concussion Biomarker Useful Up to 7 Days After Injury
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 12:00 AM

The promise of a blood test to identify patients with concussion and differentiate which patients may have more severe or persistent injuries looks closer to becoming a reality with the publication of a new large-scale study of two biomarkers of brain injury.

In their study of almost 600 trauma patients, 55% of whom had a mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI), they showed that serum levels of two biomarkers — glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) — correlated with degree of brain injury, with GFAP being the more reliable of the two.

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Use of Pneumatic Decompression Belt to Restore Spinal Height
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a pneumatic decompression belt to restore spinal height lost following an acute bout of exercise that induced compression.

This study implemented a test-retest repeated measures design in which twelve participants were recruited from a university population and acted as their own control. All participants were healthy with no previous history of disabling back pain, and were frequent weight trainers. A stadiometer was used to measure spinal height at baseline, then following an acute bout of exercise and then again following the intervention (use of a pneumatic decompression belt for 20 minutes) or control (lying supine for 20 minutes). 

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Apple Juice Promising in Kids with Mild Gastroenteritis
Written by Editor   
Saturday, September 17, 2016 12:00 AM

Children treated with diluted apple juice after admission to the emergency department (ED) for mild gastroenteritis with mild dehydration were less likely to experience treatment failure, and need intravenous fluids, than those treated with standard electrolyte maintenance solution, researchers said here.

In an intention-to-treat analysis, a composite of treatment failure (defined as hospitalization, need for IV rehydration, protracted symptoms, and subsequent unscheduled physician visits) was 16.7% in the dilute apple juice group compared to 25% of the electrolyte maintenance solution group.

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Axillary Ultrasound and Laser Combined With Postisometric Facilitation in Treatment of Shoulder Adhesive Capsulitis
Written by Editor   
Friday, September 16, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to compare axillary ultrasound, laser, and postisometric facilitation technique with standard care in the management of shoulder adhesive capsulitis.  Combining axillary ultrasound and laser with postisometric facilitation had a greater effect in reducing pain and improving shoulder ROM in patients with shoulder adhesive capsulitis compared with axillary ultrasound and laser with traditional exercise.

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Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Thursday, September 15, 2016 12:00 AM

Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem, having a substantial effect on peoples’ quality of life and placing a significant economic burden on healthcare systems and, more broadly, societies. Many interventions to alleviate LBP are available but their cost effectiveness is unclear.  This study was conducted to identify, document and appraise studies reporting on the cost effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment options for LBP.

The identified evidence suggests that combined physical and psychological treatments, medical yoga, information and education programmes, spinal manipulation and acupuncture are likely to be cost-effective options for LBP.

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Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Pelvic Floor Functional Changes in Women
Written by Editor   
Monday, September 12, 2016 12:00 AM

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a single session of spinal manipulation of pregnant women can alter pelvic floor muscle function as measured using ultrasonographic imaging.  Spinal manipulation of pregnant women in their second trimester increased the levator hiatal area at rest and thus appears to relax the pelvic floor muscles. This did not occur in the nonpregnant control participants, suggesting that it may be pregnancy related.

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Pulmonary Emboli Frequent After Knee Surgery
Written by Editor   
Sunday, September 11, 2016 12:00 AM

Patients who experience tachycardia -- either symptomatic or asymptomatic -- following knee replacement surgery are most likely to trigger an imaging examination to determine if the patient has pulmonary emboli, researchers suggest.

The study also showed that knee surgery patients were most likely to be diagnosed with pulmonary embolism, with just 22% of these complications observed among hip replacement surgeries.  If you had knee surgery and all of a sudden you have shortness of breath, there is a very good chance you have a pulmonary embolism. 

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Exercise Cuts the Risk for 13 Cancers
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 12:00 AM

Higher levels of leisure-time physical activity are associated with a significantly lower risk of developing cancer in 13 of the 26 cancers reviewed, the results of a pooled analysis of data from more than a million Europeans and Americans reveal.  That risk reduction ranged from 10% to 42%.

The affected cancers were esophageal adenocarcinoma, liver cancer, lung cancer, kidney cancer, gastric cardia cancer, endometrial cancer, myeloid leukemia, myeloma, colon cancer, head and neck cancer, rectal cancer, bladder cancer, and breast cancer.  The cancers with risk not positively affected by physical activity included those of the prostate and melanoma.

"These findings support promoting activity as a key component of population-wide cancer prevention and control efforts," say the researchers.  One commentator described the findings as “exciting,” because they "underscore the importance of leisure-time physical activity as a potential risk-reduction strategy to decrease the cancer burden in the United States and abroad."

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Outcomes Of Pregnant Patients With Low Back Pain Undergoing Chiropractic Treatment
Written by Editor   
Monday, August 22, 2016 12:00 AM

A recent study concludes: most pregnant patients undergoing chiropractic treatment reported clinically relevant improvement at all time points. This study, from the chiropractic researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, demonstrates that chiropractic care helps reduce low back pain during pregnancy, and another study by this same group demonstrates the long-term benefits from chiropractic adjustments for lumbar disc herniations.

Low back pain in pregnancy is common and research evidence on the response to chiropractic treatment is limited. The purposes of this study were:

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Abdominal Pains: Carnett sign
Written by Editor   
Monday, August 22, 2016 12:00 AM

Gastroenterologists and other clinicians often see abdominal pain complaints for sundry reasons. A lot of times we don't find the explanation that necessarily gives the diagnosis, and we push the can down the road and refer it to somebody else, or the patient is left in the lurch without an explanation.

Here is a pearl of a physical technique that’s all about back to basics, beginning with taking a good history and then confirming that with a physical finding. Let me begin with a case scenario.

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Concussion: A Pituitary Dimmer Switch
Written by Charles S. Masarsky, D.C., F.I.C.A.   
Sunday, August 21, 2016 12:00 AM

Printed with the kind permission of Editor Peter Crownfield of Dynamic Chiropractic.

The following scenario exists only in my imagination. While these specific patients are unlikely to appear in any of our offices, their clinical presentations are plausible. I invite you to assess the implications of the following thought experiment.

 A Thought Experiment

Jesse James and his brother Frank are partners in various illegal business ventures. Both came under your care for back and neck pain a few weeks ago. (They pay cash! No insurance paperwork!) Both suffered concussions during a violent episode (the details of which have not been revealed to you for some reason) approximately 7 months ago. They both recovered from all symptoms in a week or two without intervention.  During their most recent visits, in addition to neck and back pain, they have both been complaining of fatigue. 

They both go to the same primary care physician, who offered no specific diagnosis for the fatigue, but suggested that they undertake a less stressful and tiring method of making a living.

You ask Jesse if he has noticed a reduced sex drive recently. After calling you a number of unflattering names, he angrily denies this symptom, and asks you if you have any other stupid questions. You reply, “Yes, have you noticed any changes in your appetite and food choices?” Jesse calms down and considers this thoughtfully. As a matter of fact, he replies, he can’t seem to get enough salt on his food these days.

Frank answers no to both of the questions you asked Jesse. You go on to ask whether or not he has been feeling unusually hot or cold lately. He replies as a matter of fact, he seems to want a sweater or a jacket when everyone else in his gang (oops, he meant company, not gang), seems to be comfortable.

What’s Going On Here?

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