Clinical & Research
Steroids Linked to Side Effects in Adrenal Glands
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

Corticosteroids are man-made drugs designed to mimic the hormone cortisol, which the adrenal glands produce naturally. The drugs are usually used to counter inflammation in a wide range of conditions.  After stopping steroids commonly prescribed for asthma and allergies, a significant number of people may experience signs of malfunctioning in the adrenal glands, a European study finds. Adrenal insufficiency can be dangerous, especially if the person’s body has to cope with a stress like surgery, injury or a serious illness, the study authors say.

The takeaway message of the study is that in corticosteroid use there is a substantial risk of adrenal insufficiency. Patients should be aware of this risk and be informed about potential symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, weight loss and salt cravings, the authors write in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 

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D.C. to Serve on Chronic Pain Medical Collaborative
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

To adequately address pain in today’s healthcare system, the Samueli Institute, a nonprofit research organization dedicated to investigating the safety, effectiveness, and integration of healing-oriented practices, created a new multidisciplinary, person-centered chronic pain care model.

Named the Chronic Pain Breakthrough Collaborative, the program is designed to achieve breakthrough improvement in person-centered, integrative care for patients with chronic pain. James Lehman, DC, DABCO, was chosen to serve on this collaborative as one of 10 experts.  One of the goals of the collaborative is to increase access and quality of care for pain patients through patient-centered integrative pain management services.

According to the Samueli  Institute, pain is the most common reason patients seek healthcare in the United States, and is an ongoing health crisis. According to a report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2011, an estimated 100 million Americans are affected by chronic pain, with an estimated annual cost to American society of at least $560-$635 billion. 

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Medicare & Chiropractic – Back to the Basics
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

by Yvette Yarbrough, Executive Director, TBCE

All chiropractors should have completed eight hours of continuing education in Medicare coding and documentation by now, but many of you still have questions.

This article cannot even begin to scratch the surface of all of the nuances of Medicare practice, so if you have questions, RUN – don’t walk – to an attorney who specializes in chiropractic law or a subject matter expert in Medicare coding and documentation. However, a large number of questions we receive deals with a doctor’s status with Medicare and how Medicare patients can be seen, so we’ll try to provide some clarity in that area here.

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Passive ROM of the Shoulder: A Standardized Method for Measurement and Assessment of Intrarater Reliability
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater reliability and reproducibility of a standardized procedure for measuring passive shoulder movement in asymptomatic individuals.  

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Differences in Cervical Muscles During Isometric Contraction of Shoulder Muscles: A Comparison Between Patients With Chronic Neck Pain and Healthy Controls
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The purposes of this study were to (1) measure the thickness of cervical multifidus muscle (CMM) in different maximal voluntary contraction percentages of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles, (2) evaluate the differences of the CMM thickness in different directions of the shoulder movement, and (3) compare the changes in the CMM thickness of participants with neck pain and also of healthy individuals.

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Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Diathermy, and Physical Exercise on Lower Limb Arterial Blood Flow in Diabetic Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVES), continuous short wave diathermy, and physical exercise on arterial blood flow in the lower limbs of diabetic women with peripheral arterial disease.  A crossover study was carried out involving 15 diabetic women with a diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. One session of each therapeutic resource was held, with a 7-day washout period between protocols. Blood flow velocity was evaluated before each session and 0, 20, 40 and 60 minutes after the administration of each protocol. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used for the intragroup and intergroup comparisons.

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Screen Time Can Effect Vision
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

Computers, tablets, and smartphones are necessary devices in many modern workplaces. However, with the increase in screen time, whether at work or for leisure, the risk of digital eye strain has also increased.  According to a recent report from The Vision Council, more than 60 percent of adults spend five or more hours on digital devices each day. In addition, the report said that office workers who spend significant time in front of computer screens experience eye strain and undergo changes in tear fluid similar to people with dry eye disease.

“Computer Vision Syndrome” affects between 50-90 percent of computer workers because a computer screen adds the elements of screen contrast, flicker, and glare. Additionally, computer eye problems are more likely to occur in those who already have an eye problem, such as nearsightedness or astigmatism.

Computer vision syndrome symptoms may include:

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Most Face Below-Average Risk for Illness
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

A pair of researchers, in an essay online April 14 in Annals of Internal Medicine, reminds us that most patients have below-average odds of getting most illnesses and of benefiting from most treatments.  They caution against doing too much screening for disease and treating too many people unnecessarily based on the results.

Take lung cancer, for example. The risk for a typical American of developing this at some point is about 7.5%. But really, the risk for smokers is as high as 20% and the risk for nonsmokers is about 1%. "Lung cancer screening isn't even recommended for all smokers, let alone nonsmokers," one research said. "Screening generally does more harm than good for people who are at low risk."

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Visit Based Medicine or Technology Engagements?
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The new way of practicing medicine will involve fewer office visits and more between-visit engagement with patients.  With a shortage of primary care physicians, an aging population, and an epidemic of chronic disease, "this [visit-based system] is a huge imbalance."

The problem with visit-based medicine is that it's hard to figure out what the right interval is for seeing patients. "If I see you once a year, I can examine you ... and draw conclusions about what's going on with you based on that one visit. Maybe I could do it two times a year ... but we could get closer to reality if we did not think 'episodic' but instead did more representative sampling."  And those types of short, infrequent visits also aren't good for engaging patients. "Think about what happens: you're there for a 15-minute visit with your healthcare provider. You agree with [the care plan]. And what happens is you leave the office and you sort of forget.  There's no reminding, no touching base. It's hard to maintain behaviors and get people to agree to a commonly agreed-to plan unless there is some sort of engagement between visits.

If we're really going to manage people's health and not just focus on 'epistrophic' care, we really need to think about health, which is what happens outside and between visits.  A better idea would be to space the visits out a little more, establish some health literacy, and monitor patients' clinical progress -- blood sugar control, pain, blood pressure -- between visits, and set and track personal goals.  The between-visit system will need to include some automated personalized outreach, and "we need to think about workflow."  "We always think about the healthcare provider's workflow, but we need to think about patients' workflow as well."

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Muscle Strength Helps Avoid Injury
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The strength of a baseball pitcher's arm muscles may play a larger role in elbow injury risk and prevention than previously thought, a new study suggests.  "Muscles matter in baseball. We showed that a pitcher could be at a really high risk or a really low risk of elbow injury, depending on how strong and capable his muscles are," study author James Buffi, a recent Ph.D. biomedical engineering graduate from Northwestern University, said in a school news release.  This study shows that muscles play a part. If you're not accounting for muscles there could be at a really high risk or a really low risk of injury depending on the strength and capability of the muscles.

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Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Study Adding High Dose Vitamin D to Analgesic Regimens in Patients with Musculoskeletal Pain
Written by EDITOR   
Friday, May 08, 2015 12:00 AM

The current mode of therapy for many patients with musculoskeletal pain is unsatisfactory. This study aimed to assess the impact of adding 4000 IU of vitamin D on pain and serological parameters in patients with musculoskeletal pain.  It concluded that adding 4000 IU of vitamin D for patients with musculoskeletal pain may lead to a faster decline of consecutive VAS scores and to a decrease in the levels of inflammatory and pain-related cytokines.

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Register and Review CMS Payments Before May 20
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 03:40 PM

The CMS' Open Payments program collects data from drug and device manufacturers and group purchasing organizations about payments they make to physicians and teaching hospitals. The CMS encourages all physicians to register and review any payments reported about them. The review period will remain open until May 20 and will allow DCs to confirm that the data reported about them is correct by registering and reviewing the data.  To review information reported about you before it is published, and to dispute inaccurate or incomplete data, you must be a registered user in both CMS’ Enterprise Identity Management System (EIDM) and the Open Payments system. This registration requires two steps:  CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION SITE.

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Evaluation of Techniques for Monitoring Trigger Points
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

The aims of this study were to assess trigger points (TrPs), their pain threshold, and the activity of motor units in the neck and shoulder girdle muscles of young volunteers and to assess palpation, algometry, and surface electromyography (EMG) for their detection.  This study showed that the preliminary algometry and muscle motor units at rest (rEMG) recordings monitored a decrease in pressure pain threshold (PPT) and an increase in muscle tension in all cases of TrPs in each of the 3 types detected in people younger than 30 years.

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Comparison of Parameters Characterizing Lumbar Lordosis in Radiograph and Photogrammetric Examination of Adults
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to test validity of photogrammetry compared with radiography as a method of measuring the Cobb angle and the size of anterior-posterior spine curvatures in adults.  This study found that the moire method of photogrammetric measurement produced similar findings to radiographic measurements in determining size of the Cobb angle and the length of lumbar lordosis.

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4 Ways to Maintain your Brain
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

Many people want to build up some “insurance” against dementia and other memory problems. But there’s no need to invest in pricey brain-training programs. Instead, do-it-yourself lifestyle changes have been shown to help ward off memory loss and dementia,

The following strategies lead the list:

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Infant Probiotic Exposure Reduces ADHD or Aspergers Risk
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

Recent experimental evidence suggests that gut microbiota may alter function within the nervous system providing new insight on the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders.  This study of seventy-five infants who were randomized to receive Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) or placebo during the first 6 mo of life followed-up its participants for 13 years.

The study concludes that probiotic supplementation early in life may reduce the risk of neuropsychiatric disorder development later in childhood possible by mechanisms not limited to gut microbiota composition.

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Regular, Vigorous Exercise May Lengthen Your Life
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

Although any amount of exercise offers health benefits, a new study suggests that rigorous physical activity may be key to boosting longevity.  Australian researchers found that middle-aged or older people who get at least some high-intensity exercise that makes them sweaty and winded may reduce their chances of dying early by up to 13 percent.  The researchers concluded that doctors' recommendations and public health guidelines should encourage participation in some vigorous types of exercise.

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Chiropractic Research: 5-1-15
Written by Craig Benton, DC   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM
Here are some recently reported research data for you:
If referred early older patients had better function following physical therapy/chiropractic
 
 
This study summarized reports that one gets as much relief from PT as you did from Surgery for Lumbar spine stenosis.
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Research Calls for Conservative Treatments Before Painkillers for Low-Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), in response to recent research calling into question the efficacy of acetaminophen in the management of spinal pain, strongly encourages patients and healthcare providers to consider the benefits of a conservative approach to back pain.

According to the British Medical Journal study, the widely used painkiller is ineffective against low-back pain and offers only “minimal short-term benefit” for people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Similar conclusions were reached in a study published in The Lancet in July 2014, that acetaminophen “does not ease low-back pain.”

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Cold Packs on Extremities Aid in Heat Stroke
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

New method may ease danger more quickly.

Symptoms of heat stroke may be eased by applying cold packs to the cheeks, hands and feet, a study suggests, potentially offering a new way to help lower body temperatures in overheated athletes.

"The cheeks, palms, and soles of the feet are special areas," with blood vessels that don't contract when cold packs are applied, helping to remove heat from the skin surface and cool body temperatures, said study co-author Dr. Grant Lipman, a researcher in emergency medicine at Stanford University in California.

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Migraine Drug May Up Risk of Eating Disorders in Some Teens
Written by Editor   
Friday, May 01, 2015 12:00 AM

A new report has linked a migraine medication to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens.  The drug in question is called topiramate (Topamax). It's an established migraine drug for adults that was just approved for use in teens in 2014. Appetite reduction and weight loss are common side effects of the drug, according to the report authors.  For a handful of kids the weight loss can trigger symptoms of an eating disorder.

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The Etiology of Cervical Artery Dissection
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

The etiology of cervical artery dissection (CAD) is, for the most part, unclear; and what has been proposed as an explanation for its pathogenesis is largely hypothetical. Nevertheless, a number of risk factors have been reported to be associated with the condition, including connective tissue abnormalities, hypertension, recent infection, migraine headache, the use of oral contraceptives, and others. Of special interest to chiropractors is the role cervical spine manipulation (CSM).  

The understanding of CAD is greatly enhanced by having a basic grasp of the relevant anatomy. A pair of vertebral arteries (VAs) and a pair of internal carotid arteries (ICAs) pass through the cervical region to supply the brain with blood. The ICAs and their branches are often referred to as the anterior circulation because they supply blood to the anterior portion of the brain. The vertebral and basilar arteries comprise the vertebrobasilar system, which is referred to as the posterior circulation because it supplies blood to the posterior brain.

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A Role for Neck Manipulation in Elderly – Falls Prevention
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

Falls in the elderly can be due to many causes. Dizziness is an important risk factor for these falls. In this overview of the literature, we examine the relationship between non-specific dizziness, an important form of dizziness in the elderly, and neck pain and dysfunction. 

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A New Clinical Research Priority
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

Chiropractors with clinical research training have traditionally focused on the spine and its related disorders and especially neck and low back pain. Examples include the recent Decade of the Bone and Joint 2000–2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders as well as several excellent randomized trials of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for neck and low back pain.

Despite these and many other research successes, from 1990 to 2010 disability from spine-related pain has significantly increased, with low back pain now the leading cause of global disability, affecting 10% of the population or more than 600 million people worldwide. Over the same two decades, disability from other musculoskeletal disorders has also increased by 44.6%, and with an aging and increasingly sedentary society this trend is likely to continue and so too will the demand for improved care and prevention. Even patients seeking care for neck and low back pain rarely have pain isolated to just the spine and frequently report co-occurring non-spinal pain, not to mention other co-morbid diseases. Chiropractors already commonly manage a variety of musculoskeletal disorders and at different anatomical sites, not just those related to the spine. Taken together, these facts provide a good basis to promote the growth of clinical research efforts in other non-spinal musculoskeletal areas.

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Hearing Loss, Otalgia and Neck Pain
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

The association between mechanical musculoskeletal problems and visceral symptoms remains tenuous, particularly when assessed by the standards of science. Many in the chiropractic profession accept as a useful clinical premise that such an association exists. Clarifying the issue is important and can proceed only by documenting examples of such associations. In the first instance, this evidence is gathered by case reports and cross-sectional surveys. To date, cross-sectional surveys suggest that between 1 % and 10% of persons seeking chiropractic care do so for a problem not directly associated with the spine.

To describe symptom reports, multiple chiropractic assessments and adjustments over 7 years with a patient experiencing neck pain and complex ear symptoms consistent with Meniere’s syndrome.  Observation over an extended period assists in understanding the progression of chronic disorders. This patient experienced substantially reduced symptoms with chiropractic care during the 7-year observation period. Of note is the repeated exacerbation of neck pain that often precedes exacerbation in ear symptoms, along with the relief of both following adjustment and an association between improved hearing and improved cervical alignment.

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Efficacy of Manual and Manipulative Therapy in the Perception of Pain and Cervical Motion in Patients with Tension-type Headache
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of manipulative and manual therapy treatments with regard to pain perception and neck mobility in patients with tension-type headache.  Both treatments, administered both separately and combined together, showed efficacy for patients with tension-type headache with regard to pain perception. As for cervical ranges of motion, treatments produced greater effect when separately administered.

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Physical Exams: Where’s the Beef?
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

The recent flurry about the pros and cons of physical examinations has been informed by another timely publication. The authors make some critical points that should be considered in the current debate.  First, they say, “physical examination might represent waste when applied without context.”  That is exactly why the physical exam has lost traction as the “yearly physical,” which definitely lacks context.

Second, “we need to shift our emphasis . . . [and ask for] more robust evidence basis.”

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New Study Suggests Vitamin D Recommendations Miscalculated
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D is ten times lower than what we actually need, say two teams of researchers who have challenged the US’s National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM), both responsible for the RDA.

“The error has broad implications for public health regarding disease prevention and achieving the stated goal of ensuring that the whole population has enough vitamin D to maintain bone health,” says Dr. Cederic Garland, an adjunct professor at University of California, San Diego.

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Cross-Sectional Analysis of Telomere Length in People 33-80 Years of Age: Effects of Dietary Supplementation
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

Telomere length has been associated with aging, age-related diseases, adverse conditions, and mortality. Moreover, studies in humans suggest a causal role of short telomeres or accelerated telomere shortening in disease and mortality risk. The objective of the current cross-sectional study was to explore the effect of dietary supplementation on telomere length.

The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that dietary supplementation significantly attenuated telomere shortening in subjects compared to a healthy control group. Longitudinal studies are warranted to further explore the link between nutritional supplementation and healthy aging in the context of reduced rate of telomere shortening.

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Benefits Of Exercise Outweigh Dieting In Aging Adults Managing Their Weight
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 24, 2015 12:00 AM

Nearly two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese, especially as they age.  As we get older our bodies metabolize calories more slowly, and we just aren’t capable of doing the things we used to do. This also means that, as we age, we might also witness our waistlines getting bigger.  The strange thing is that as people get older, they tend to eat much healthier than they did as students.  Older people are more likely to turn to responsible food choices like salads and lean meats. But if our diets improve as we get older, then why do we still get fat as we age?

According to a new study, it’s because physical activity has a greater impact on our weight and health than diet does as we grow older. The study examined 4,999 American adults between the ages of 20 and 70 by using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and recorded information about people’s weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and diet.  This study points to the very important impact of physical activity on weight status in U.S. adults, and in particular it points to the critical role of the age-related decline in physical activity on the increasing rates of overweight and obesity that we see with aging.

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Identification of Internal Carotid Artery Dissection in Chiropractic Practice
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) is a condition wherein there is a separation of the artery’s intimal lining from its medial division, with subsequent extension of the dissection along varying distances of the artery, usually in the direction of blood flow. It has been suggested that ICAD produces stroke in 36–68% of patients as a result of occlusion of the artery at or near the site of the dissection, or embolization occurring distally from a dislodged fragment of thrombus.

ICAD is not a rare condition, with incidence estimates exceeding 7,000 cases per year in the United States. Accordingly, patients with this disorder may present to DCs for treatment of associated symptoms that often mimic musculoskeletal conditions. Established chiropractic patients may also develop ICAD coincidentally during their course of chiropractic management, with no relationship to manipulation. However, when ICAD is recognized, an urgent referral for a neurological and vascular evaluation is appropriate. This article summarizes the presentation, diagnosis, and proper management of patients with this potentially life-threatening condition.

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Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Exercise For Seniors with Chronic Neck Pain
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Neck pain, common among the elderly population, has considerable implications on health and quality of life. Evidence supports the use of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and exercise to treat neck pain; however, no studies to date have evaluated the effectiveness of these therapies specifically in seniors.  Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) with home exercise resulted in greater pain reduction after 12 weeks of treatment compared with both supervised home exercise (HE) and HE alone. Supervised exercise sessions added little benefit to the HE-alone program.

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Forward Head Posture Corrective Exercises in the Management of Lumbosacral Radiculopathy
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Lumbosacral radiculopathy associated with disk herniation is one of the most common health-related complaints.  The challenge that clinicians face results from focusing on pathoanatomy as one of the most common etiological factors of back pain, ignoring the significant role of dysfunction.  Abnormal posture is one of the most important etiological factors associated with low back pain.

Studies have reported that many postural reflexes such as the vestibulocollic reflex, cervicocollic reflex, pelvo-ocular reflex, vestibuloocular reflex, cervico-ocular reflex, and cervical somatosensory input are located or occur in the head and neck region.  Given the high incidence of forward head posture, especially in older adults, a correction of this abnormal posture must achieve optimal postural correction in which the spine orients itself according to the normalized reference point.  Although the effect that forward head posture has on the entire nervous system has been reported, there are few controlled studies evaluating the effect of abnormal head posture on lumbar nerve root function. The current evidence to support the role of forward head posture correction in patients with lumbar disk herniation radiculopathy lacks the experimental data to support a cause-and-effect relationship and interventional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of a multimodal program, with the addition of forward head posture correction, on disability, 3-dimensional spinal posture parameters, back and leg pain, and S1 nerve root function of patients with chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy.

The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate and long-term effects of a multimodal program, with the addition of forward head posture correction, in patients with chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy.  The addition of forward head posture correction to a functional restoration program seemed to positively affect disability, 3-dimensional spinal posture parameters, back and leg pain, and S1 nerve root function of patients with chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy.

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Does Pilates Make You Taller?
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Pilates strengthens your core, but does it also make you taller?  According to a former Miss World, the exercises added some height on her 5-foot-9 frame.  “I've stretched out about half-an-inch through Pilates,” Rosanna Davison reported.  But don’t confuse “Pilates makes you taller” with “Pilates helps you grow,” explains Dr. Karen Erickson, a New York chiropractor and spokeswoman for the American Chiropractic Association.

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Folic Acid May Help Ward Off Stroke in People With High Blood Pressure
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Folic acid may also help lower stroke risk in people with high blood pressure, a new Chinese study finds.

The findings are intriguing, one U.S. heart health expert said.  "If all that is required to prevent the greatest health threat worldwide is a vitamin, then we need to consider checking patients' blood levels of folic acid and supplementing if needed." 

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Standing Desks Can Cause Problems
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Sitting is the new smoking, they say, and studies have linked too many hours on your duff to an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, cancer and early death. Not even regular exercise can counteract the health impact of sitting all day long.Standing desks offer an alternative to sitting for most of the day -- which has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other health problems -- but some people may be causing themselves harm by not using the desks properly, experts say. Taking breaks from standing, avoiding unsupportive footwear and keeping knees bent are all ways to help avoid pain.

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Make Gardening and Yard Work Pain Free
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Spring season brings more chances to get outdoors and ramp up physical activity. After the winter chill, many people jump at the opportunity to spend time outside planting bulbs, mowing the lawn and pulling weeds.  Gardening can provide a great workout, but with all the bending, twisting, reaching and pulling, the body may not be ready for exercise of the garden variety. And if the body is not prepared for the sudden increase in activity, one can develop strains and sprains that involve soft tissues, muscles, tendons and ligaments.

"A warm-up and cool-down period is as important in gardening as it is for any other physical activity," says Scott Bautch, DC, DACBOH, of the American Chiropractic Association's (ACA) Council on Occupational Health. "It is important to stretch your muscles before reaching for your gardening tools. The back, upper legs, shoulders, and wrists are all major muscle groups affected when using your green thumb. Performing simple stretches during these periods will help alleviate injuries, pain and stiffness."

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Risk of Stroke After Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation in Medicare B Beneficiaries Aged 66 to 99 Years With Neck Pain
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to quantify risk of stroke after chiropractic spinal manipulation, as compared to evaluation by a primary care physician, for Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 to 99 years with neck pain.  Among Medicare B beneficiaries aged 66 to 99 years with neck pain, incidence of vertebrobasilar stroke was extremely low. Small differences in risk between patients who saw a chiropractor and those who saw a primary care physician are probably not clinically significant.

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Top 10 Nutrition Basics
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM
1. Eat three meals and two snacks every day: The Truestar Meal Plansemphasize optimal weight and health by offering three delicious meals and two tasty snacks daily. Studies show that individuals who eat four or more times a day are 45% less likely to be obese than those who eat three times a day or less.

 

2. Always eat breakfast: Research clearly shows that individuals who skip breakfast have the greatest tendency to gain weight! Click here to learn more.

 

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Does Whiplash Trigger Fibromyalgia?
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

Whiplash injury most likely does not lead to fibromyalgia. One year after acute whiplash, only 0.8% of victims developed fibromyalgia, a Canadian researcher reports.

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Long-term Multivitamin-mineral Use Tied to Women’s Heart Health
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 10, 2015 12:00 AM

A new analysis of deaths from heart disease over more than 20 years finds that women who took multivitamin-mineral supplements for three years or more were significantly less likely to die.  The authors urge caution because the benefit was not seen among men using the supplements long-term, among women taking them for less than three years or in anyone taking just multivitamins without minerals.

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Recognition of Spontaneous Vertebral Artery Dissection
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 10, 2015 12:00 AM

The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented to a chiropractic physician for evaluation and treatment of neck pain and headache.  This case highlights the potential for patients with vertebral artery dissection to present with nonspecific musculoskeletal complaints. Neurological symptoms may not manifest initially, but their sudden onset indicates the possibility of an ischemic cerebrovascular event. We suggest that early recognition and emergent referral for this patient avoided potential exacerbation of an evolving pre-existing condition and resulted in timely anticoagulation treatment.

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A Randomized Controlled Trial on Treatment of Cervicogenic Sudden Hearing Loss With Chiropractic
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 10, 2015 12:00 AM

A study was conducted to investigate the clinical effect and safety of chiropractic in treating cervicogenic sudden hearing loss.  Compared with routine method for cervicogenic sudden hearing loss, additional chiropractic can improve hearing and relieve neck pain effectively.

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Knee OA Common in Younger People a Year After ACL Repair
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 10, 2015 12:00 AM

Almost one-third of young patients have evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee as defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) one year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), new research suggests.  Of 111 participants in a study who had undergone ACLR a year earlier nineteen-percent met the MRI criteria for tibiofemoral OA while another seventeen-percent met the MRI criteria for patellofemoral OA.  Together, this meant thirty-one percent of participants had MRI-defined knee OA overall one year after ACLR.

In contrast, among uninjured controls, none had MRI-defined patellofemoral or tibiofemoral OA.  "And our data extend those of recent MRI studies that suggest ACLR does not restore a knee to normal," the authors wrote.

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Restricting Fructose Cuts Liver Fat in Kids
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 10, 2015 12:00 AM

In just 10 days, restricting the amount of fructose children consumed through sugary drinks and juices resulted in "dramatic" reductions in liver fat, researchers reported.  During the intervention, the conversion of sugar to fat in the 40 children in the study declined by 56% and the liver fat declined by more than 20%.  There were no calorie differences in the diets as the meals prepared for the study participants had simple sugars replaced with complex carbohydrates.

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Chiropractic and Ankylosing Spondylitis
Saturday, March 14, 2015 04:16 PM

ACCORDING TO THE SPONDYLITIS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a form of arthritis that primarily affects the spine, although other joints can become involved. It causes inflammation of the vertebrae, which can lead to severe, chronic pain and discomfort. In the most advanced cases (but not in all), this inflammation can result in new bone formation on the spine, causing it to fuse in a fixed, immobile position, sometimes creating a forward-stooped posture. This forward curvature is called kyphosis.

It is important to differentiate between mechanical and inflammatory back pain when diagnosing patients. When dealing with mechanical back pain, usually a patient will rest and then feel better; while often the pain will last only a month or two. “With inflammatory back pain, they feel stiff, and it worsens with rest or inactivity, and it occurs early morning and later at night,” he says. “If they exercise, it feels a little bit better, and it lasts more than three months.”

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Rapid Structural Damage Drives Pain and Dysfunction in Early OA
Saturday, March 14, 2015 04:14 PM

In patients with early symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA), pain and physical functioning remain fairly stable over the medium term of 4 or 5 years, especially in those with slow radiographic progression. Rapid radiographic progression, however, is associated with increased pain and diminished function, according to a two-cohort comparative study. "For the physician, these findings ... may provide a legitimation for symptomatic treatment." 

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Unlevel Pelvis in the High-School Athlete: Exploring Causes and Effects
Saturday, March 14, 2015 03:48 PM

The unlevel pelvis is all too common in the high-school athlete and if not detected, will likely cause a lifetime of musculoskeletal issues. Any provider who doesn't look for this common finding is missing critical information.

An unlevel pelvis, defined as a pelvis that has one ilium higher than the other ilium, is typically seen on an A-P lumbar X-ray. Let's explore the biomechanical consequences of the unlevel pelvis, along with common causes and how you can address the problem before it becomes a chronic issue.

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Onset of Knee Pain in OA Begins on Stairs
Saturday, March 14, 2015 03:46 PM

In patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), pain likely first appears during weight-bearing activities that involve bending of the knee, such as climbing stairs, a new study suggests.  The large observational analysis of people with confirmed radiographic knee OA, or those considered at high risk for this condition, found that of five activities that may result in mechanical loading on the knee joint, using stairs was most likely to be the first to cause pain.

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Foot Pain Worsens Effects of Knee OA
Saturday, March 14, 2015 03:39 PM

Foot pain was common among patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and affected both general measures of health and knee-specific symptoms, Australian researchers found.

One in four (25.3%) patients with symptomatic knee OA reported pain in one or both feet/ankles on at least half of the days during the previous month.  "While it is recognized that multiple joint symptoms are both common and disabling in people with knee OA, concurrent foot and knee pain is rarely described and its prevalence is unclear," authors noted.  "The between-group differences suggested these changes are clinically meaningful," the researchers observed.

Possible mechanisms for the development of foot pain in knee OA include varus malalignment and excess pronation.

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Being Active Tied to Lower Alcoholism Risk
Saturday, March 14, 2015 03:05 PM

Getting more exercise throughout life is tied to a reduced risk of abusing alcohol that requires treatment, according to a new study from Denmark.  In a group of adults followed for 20 years, those who reported being more active in their free time were less likely to need hospitalization or treatment for an alcohol use disorder, but the direction and explanation for the relationship is unclear.

“Although we and for that matter others have not proven a causal relationship between physical activity and risk of developing alcohol use disorders, it is likely that there is a causal link,” said the coauthor of the new report.

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