Clinical & Research
Benefits of Adjustable Desks Still Unclear
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 10, 2015 05:42 PM

Sitting for long periods of time has been linked to an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, cancer and early death, even among people who exercise regularly. Yet employees in administrative and professional/managerial occupations often sit for more than three-quarters of their total time at work.  Height-adjustable desks are growing in popularity in office settings as an answer for this problem, but there's little hard evidence that they improve the health of office workers, according to a new review of existing research.  Indeed, there has been very little research testing whether people using the desks spend less time sitting, or if they do, whether that improves their mental or physical health, researchers say.

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Low Vitamin D Levels Common in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 10, 2015 05:28 PM

Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with significantly reduced vitamin D levels, independent of sunlight exposure, a new study finds.

The study suggests a possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and therefore a potential role of supplementation in its treatment.

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Tool Developed to Predict Progression from Acute to Chronic Pain
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 02:45 PM
Quick Brief:  Researchers develop a clinical decision rule for determining the risk of acute low back pain becoming chronic.

 

Researchers studied data on 605 patients with acute lower back pain in developing a clinical decision rule (CDR) that uses eight criteria for determining the risk of chronic pain. "A CDR was developed that may help primary care clinicians classify patients with strictly defined acute LBP into low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups for developing chronic pain and performed acceptably in 1,000 bootstrapped replications," authors write. The researchers found that 13 and 19 percent of the patients had chronic pain at six months and two years, respectively. 

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Chiropractic College Research: Evidence as Validation
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 02:29 PM
Quick Brief:  Research is a critical need for the chiropractic profession, but for various reasons our profession is not thoroughly represented in the field of clinical research.  Competition for limited funding is keeping chiropractic research in the USA lagging behind several foreign countries.

 

Perhaps the greatest research weakness the chiropractic profession has is a lack of appreciation for just how important clinically-based, patient-oriented outcomes research will be in the near future as the U.S. health care system continues to evolve. “We have a real need to develop evidence-based best practices — not just to improve patient results but also to validate chiropractic for the benefit of payers and health policy makers,” says Dr. Lauretti. “Further real-world research is needed to demonstrate our worth.”

Top-level research supports and expands the credibility of the chiropractic profession. Research discoveries lead to new clinical applications, cross-disciplinary work and collaboration with other medical professionals and institutions. Successful research can also energize a DC’s approach to practice and improve patient outcomes. Countries like Denmark, Canada, Switzerland and Australia are conducting impressive clinical research studies that are filling gaps in our knowledge base and validating how we treat patients. 

More chiropractic research is emphasizing clinical outcomes. “It’s not enough to demonstrate to third-party payers that you have a reasonable biological mechanism for your care — they want to see evidence that it actually works in the real world with real patients,” says William J. Lauretti, DC, and associate professor of chiropractic clinical sciences at New York Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls, N.Y. 

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Widely Used Antidepressants Linked to Bone Fractures in Menopausal Women
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 02:05 PM
Quick Brief:  Women taking SSRI medications are up to 76% more likely to break a bone regardless of the reason for taking the SSRI.

 

Women taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat menopausal symptoms are up to 76% more likely to break a bone, according to an observational study.

SSRI use for nonpsychiatric conditions such as VMS, irritable bowel syndrome, and premature ejaculation has increased to the point that antidepressants are the third most commonly prescribed class of drug in the U.S., with much of that growth attributable to non-psychiatrists prescribing to patients without a psychiatric disorder, the investigators noted.

The increased risk persists for at least 5 years following initiation of SSRI treatment, suggesting that shortening treatment could reduce the risk, said the senior investigator. 

"To our knowledge, the current study is the first to examine whether SSRI use is related to fracture risks in a population of middle-aged women without known psychiatric disorders, a demographic for which, given the recent FDA approval of paroxetine for the treatment of VMS (vasomotor menopausal symptoms), SSRI use may increase," the investigators wrote.

 

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Back Pain Triggers Recalled Fewer than 20% of the Time
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 01:56 PM
Quick Brief:  People with lower back pain often think a specific moment of extreme exertion triggered their sudden discomfort. Only 17 percent of patients in this study recalled experiencing specific triggers for lower back pain during the previous 24 hours prior to presentation.

 

People with lower back pain often think a specific moment of extreme exertion triggered their sudden discomfort.  An Australian study suggests simple daily tasks can just as easily contribute, but when researchers asked 999 adults what caused their back problems, about two-thirds blamed a specific experience on the day their pain surfaced.  Because triggers for lower back pain can occur days, weeks or even months before the sudden onset of discomfort, however, it’s likely that many patients misplaced blame.

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U.S. Kids Not Drinking Enough Water Each Day
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 01:15 PM
Quick Brief:  Many American children and teens are not consuming enough liquids every day. This potential public health problem poses a significant health risk.

 

Many American children and teens aren't consuming enough liquids -- especially water -- and that lack of hydration could affect their physical and mental health, a new study suggests.  The findings "highlight a potential health issue that has not been given a whole lot of attention in the past,” the study's author stated.  "Even though for most of these kids this is not an immediate, dramatic health threat, this is an issue that could really be reducing quality of life and well-being for many, many children and youth," she added.

Children can be more susceptible to dehydration than adults.  That, coupled with an already impaired hydration status, can have physiological problems such as neurological issues, increased demands on their kidneys and heat stroke.

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If White Coat Causes Spike, Heart Risk Climbs
Written by Editor   
Friday, July 03, 2015 01:05 PM
Quick Brief:  It seems that "white coat syndrome" when it comes to hypertension is still an indicator of increased risk of cardiovascular events.

 

Hypertension seen in the office but not on home monitoring or vice versa might still carry some cardiovascular risk according to two separate studies supporting 24-hour monitoring.  In one study, after adjustment for other factors, white coat hypertension was associated with a 2.01-fold higher risk of cardiovascular events than those with completely normal blood pressure.

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World's Population Is Getting Sicker
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 11:05 AM

Quick Brief: In 2013 only about 4% of the Earths population had no health problems.  33% had more than 5 health problems, the most common being:  Low back pain, depression, iron-deficiency anemia, neck pain and age-related hearing loss.

Two conditions -- musculoskeletal problems (mainly conditions such as low back pain, neck pain and arthritis) and mental health/substance abuse disorders (mainly depression, anxiety, and drug and alcohol abuse) -- accounted for nearly half of all loss of healthy years of life.

"Large, preventable causes of health loss, particularly serious musculoskeletal disorders and mental and behavioral disorders, have not received the attention that they deserve." study author said.

 

People lose more 'years of healthy life' to illness now than they did in the 1990s, global survey reports.  A new global tally of health finds that only about 4 percent of people worldwide had no health problems in 2013, while a third -- about 2.3 billion people -- had more than five health problems.

And the situation is getting worse, not better: Worldwide, the proportion of years of healthy life people lost because of illness (rather than simply dying earlier) rose from 21 percent in 1990 to 31 percent in 2013, according to the Global Burden of Disease study.

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Brittle Bones and Broken Hips: Drugs Aren't the Answer
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 10:59 AM

Quick Brief: The British Medical Journal reports that after reviewing 33 previous studies, the conclusion is that medications for osteoporosis do little to prevent hip fractures, and that focus on drug treatment has eclipsed other approaches patients can take to prevent fractures, such as nutrition and exercise. "Advice that works for anyone, regardless of bone fragility, and the benefits encompass the entire human body," the paper says. 

As for drug treatment, the researchers conclude, "the dominant approach to hip fracture prevention is neither viable as a public health strategy nor cost effective."

 

Drugs to increase bone strength that have reaped billions of dollars in sales aren't worth the cost and the risk of side effects, researchers argue in the British Medical Journal

Medications for osteoporosis do little to prevent hip fractures, the most devastating consequence of the disease, the authors conclude. And they can sidetrack patients who should instead be exercising, eating right, and quitting smoking.

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Farewell to (Trans) Fats
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 10:23 AM
Quick Brief: The FDA passed new regulations removing partially hydrogenated oils from the "generally recognized as safe" category of foods.  Manufacturers have 3 years to remove such from their products, or seek special permission from the FDA to include them in their foods.  Naturally occurring trans fats are not affected by the regulation.

 

A number of popular foods are about to lighten up. The FDA is all but banning the use of partially hydrogenated oils in processed food. Under the new FDA regulations, partially hydrogenated oils, which have been shown to raise LDL cholesterol, will be considered food additives that cannot be used unless authorized by the FDA.  Found in some processed foods, including desserts, microwave popcorn, frozen pizzas, coffee creamer, and margarines, transfats can raise LDL ''bad'' cholesterol and lower HDL ''good" cholesterol. 

The FDA decision removes trans fats from a category of ingredients known as 'generally recognized as safe" (GRAS). Ingredients in this category can be added to food without FDA approval. The new regulations take effect in three years, giving companies time to either reformulate products without partially hydrogenated oils or petition the FDA to permit specific uses of them.  Following the compliance period, no partially hydrogenated oils can be added to human food unless they are otherwise approved by the FDA.

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Is Your Nervous System Being Hacked by Bacteria in Your Gut?
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 09:47 AM
Quick Brief:  Bacteria in the gut stimulating the vagus nerve can have a direct effect on the nervous system and upon the development of the brain and emotions.

 

The vagus nerve brings information from all over the body to the brain – but is it being hacked by the bacteria in our gut?  Some 80 per cent of the traffic along the vagus nerve is sensory information sent up to the brain by the body, and researchers are beginning to realise this has a significant influence on the mind. There is also now strong evidence from animal studies that the gut’s microbial residents – known as the microbiome – can activate the vagus nerve, with effects on brain and behaviour.

The link between gut flora and disorders such as depression and autism has been recognised for some years. Recent experiments have demonstrated that mice with behavioural disorders (equivalent to certain human mental health problems) have a significantly different microbiome make-up from healthy mice, and that these bacteria may be causing the problems.

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Research Findings
Written by Craig Benton, DC   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 08:45 AM
Quick Brief: A summary with links to various research studies that you may find of interest.


These studies were performed by MDs.  Contrary to TMA statements to the effect that the research demonstrating chiropractic effectiveness was like the fox guarding the hen house, it is their research demonstrates our effectiveness.

The study below shows that patients who respond to spinal manipulation also have a biomechanical aspect of their lower back pain:

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Iron Reduces Parasomnias in Children With Restless Legs
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 08:34 AM
Quick Brief:  Decreased iron levels, restless leg syndrome, and night terrors seem to be associated and also seem to respond well to increasing iron levels in the blood to above 50 ng/mL.

 

Children who have night terrors associated with restless leg syndrome appear amenable to treatment with ferritin supplements, researchers report.

Eighteen of 31 children diagnosed with parasomnias in addition to restless legs syndrome or periodic limb movement disorder achieved relief from their movement disorders with iron therapy.  The author reported that 42% also showed a decrease in parasomnia symptoms. "Iron therapy leads to significant improvement in the periodic limb movement index and restless legs syndrome symptoms." 

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Motion Sensor Biofeedback Improves Low Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 25, 2015 08:21 AM
Quick Brief: The use of motion-sensor biofeedback has a positive effect in reducing pain and limitations in activity in patients with low back pain and suggests that movement retraining using biofeedback is capable of resulting in sustained improvements, even after treatment finishes.

 

Changing a person's posture and movement using motion-sensor biofeedback reduces pain and reduces limitations in activity in patients with low back pain (LBP) compared with guidelines-based management, Danish researchers have found in a comparative effectiveness study.

"Our results suggest that where a relationship between movement and pain can be identified, movement retraining using biofeedback is capable of resulting in sustained improvements in pain and activity limitation, even after treatment finishes, and indicate that a fully powered trial is warranted," the authors wrote.

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Lost Posture: Why Some Indigenous Cultures May Not Have Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 04:21 PM
Quick Brief: Researchers determine that a “J” shaped spine as depicted in 19th century anatomy books is preferable to an “S” shaped spine as depicted modernly.

 

Primal posture: Ubong tribesmen in Borneo (right) display the perfect J-shaped spines. A woman in Burkina Faso (left) holds her baby so that his spine stays straight. The center image shows the S-shaped spine drawn in a modern anatomy book (Fig. I) and the J-shaped spine (Fig. II) drawn in the 1897 anatomy book Traite d'Anatomie Humaine.

Primal posture: Ubong tribesmen in Borneo (right) display the perfect J-shaped spines. A woman in Burkina Faso (left) holds her baby so that his spine stays straight. The center image shows the S-shaped spine drawn in a modern anatomy book (Fig. I) and the J-shaped spine (Fig. II) drawn in the 1897 anatomy book Traite d'Anatomie Humaine


Believe it or not, there are a few cultures in the world where back pain hardly exists. One indigenous tribe in central India reported essentially none. And the discs in their backs showed little signs of degeneration as people aged.

An acupuncturist in Palo Alto, Calif., thinks she has figured out why. She has traveled around the world studying cultures with low rates of back pain — how they stand, sit and walk. Now she's sharing their secrets with back pain sufferers across the U.S.  About two decades ago, Esther Gokhale had a herniated disc. Eventually she had surgery to fix it. But a year later, it happened again. This time around, Gokhale wanted to find a permanent fix for her back. And she wasn't convinced Western medicine could do that. So Gokhale started to think outside the box. She had an idea: "Go to populations where they don't have these huge problems and see what they're doing."

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Beta-Blockers During Surgery Can Increase Mortality Risk
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 03:27 PM
Quick Brief: It is now clear that a patient without cardiac risk factors should NOT be started on a beta-blocker before a major surgery.

 

"Our study is the first to show this risk increase in this population.  It is now clear that a patient with no cardiac risk factors should not be started on a beta-blocker for a major surgery."

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Persistent Sleep Trouble Common in Kids With Brain Injuries
Written by Edior   
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 03:24 PM
Quick Brief: Children with TBI have more disturbed sleep patterns than those without such injuries.

 

Children suffering traumatic brain injuries had more disturbed sleep patterns and more daytime sleepiness months later than their peers without such injuries, researchers reported.

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Older Americans Need Protein to Keep Muscles Strong
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 03:17 PM
Quick Brief: Older Americans need to ensure that their diet is adequate in protein.

 

Older adults need a protein-rich diet to maintain muscle mass and strength, a new study suggests.

Protein should come from animal and plant sources, since each type of protein appears to play different roles in maintaining lean muscle mass and leg strength. Plant protein helps preserve muscle strength, while animal protein is linked to muscle mass, the researchers said.

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CE For New Licensees
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 11, 2015 12:00 AM

Your first renewal cycle is pro-rated and is usually not a full twelve months long, so completion of your Continuing Education (CE) requirements is not required until after your first license renewal. When you renew your license for the second time, you should have completed sixteen (16) hours of approved CE, including the four (4) hours in Board-required topics.

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Cyrex Labs Launches Comprehensive Food Sensitivity Test for 180 Food Antigens
Friday, June 05, 2015 08:49 AM

Cyrex Laboratories, a clinical laboratory specializing in functional immunology and autoimmunity, launched its innovative Array 10, a multiple food immune reactivity screen. Array 10 is the most innovative immune reactivity food panel on the market.  The result of 30 years of scientific development, Array 10 features 10 advanced proprietary technologies by Cyrex. 

First, unlike other labs, Array 10 tests 180 cooked, raw and modified foods. Array 10 is unique to Cyrex in that it tests for immune reactivity to foods the way in which foods are most likely consumed (cooked, raw or modified). The reasoning behind testing for reactivity to cooked, modified and raw foods is once a food is heated to 118 degrees or more, the protein structure, and therefore its antigenicity may change. This “real-world” approach to testing minimizes the risk of missing reactivity to some of the most common foods.

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Flip-flops take some heat, but Spenco says: Make it a flip-flop summer with Spenco
Friday, June 05, 2015 08:44 AM

From health magazines to mainstream media, the flip-flop, a treasured summer tradition, lately has come under fire. Spenco Medical Corporation, a leader in footwear and foot care products, is speaking out in favor of the toe-freeing style, but reminds consumers that not all flip-flops are created equally.

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Managing Hypertension: Technology Challenges Old Habits
Friday, June 05, 2015 08:39 AM

Are automated office blood pressure measurements the way to go for routine check-ups?  Yes, argues Martin Myers, MD, a cardiologist and researcher.

What's wrong with the standard blood pressure cuff in the physicians' office?

"There's a myth that manual blood pressure -- blood pressure taken with a mercury device and stethoscope -- is accurate in the real world. The overwhelming evidence that in routine clinical practice doctors and nurses don't take manual blood pressure in the office with the same care according to guidelines as has been done in research studies with the result that the studies have shown that on average the blood pressure is about 10/5 mm Hg higher. So if we really wanted to look at what the cutpoint for hypertension in the real world in clinical practice is, it would be 150/95 not 140/90 just because it has been taken so poorly."

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Steroids No Better for Sciatica Pain Than Placebo
Friday, June 05, 2015 08:38 AM

Doctors often prescribe steroid pills to ease the discomfort of sciatica -- back and leg pain usually caused by a herniated disk in the lower back.  But a new study finds steroids are no more effective than a placebo pill for the pain and provide only modest improvement in function.

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Vegan Diet Eases Nerve Pain of Diabetes
Written by Lance Moore   
Friday, June 05, 2015 08:29 AM

For people with diabetes, switching to a plant-based diet may ease the searing nerve that can come with the condition, and perhaps reduce their risk of losing a limb, a small pilot study has found.

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Solicitation and Texas Law
Written by Editor   
Thursday, June 04, 2015 12:00 AM

by Bryan Snoddy, General Counsel

Roughly one of every five phone calls and inquiries received by the Board’s legal staff is “Can I advertise this way” or “Will I get in trouble if I say this?

Let’s try to address some of those issues by reflecting upon some fairly concrete concepts that are well established in the law and the Board’s rules.

The first thing to recall is that the Board is a state agency of limited power. The primary limits on the power of the Board come from law that is enacted by the Legislature. As in the last Newsletter (Volume II, Issue 3- January 2015), the Texas Chiropractic Act provides both the source and the limitations on the Board’s authority.

Next, let’s examine a few of the important parts of the Chiropractic Act. The initial reference to advertising under the Act is located at section 201.155. This section provides that the Board may not adopt rules restricting advertising or competitive bidding by a person regulated by the Board except to prohibit false, misleading or deceptive practice by that person.

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Chiropractic Physicians Urge Conservative Approach to Pain Management
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 08:17 PM

With new research highlighting more risks associated with the increased use of opioids for pain, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) strongly urges patients and healthcare providers to consider first exhausting conservative forms of pain management.  In recent comments submitted to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Office of Pain Policy on the draft National Pain Strategy, the ACA strongly urges the agency to include recommendations encouraging patients and health care providers to first exhaust conservative forms of pain management, when appropriate.

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AACE to Offer New Obesity Guidelines, Tools
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:43 PM

Still more changes are coming to the advice that the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists gives to clinicians for managing obese patients.  AACE is expected to release new evidence-based guidelines for managing obesity, as well as a "toolkit" for clinicians, in the next few months. The association now relies on a "framework," or algorithm, that clinicians can use to treat the disease, but it isn't evidence-based, said Timothy Garvey, MD, who is chair of the AACE Obesity Scientific Committee and a professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"We really don't have evidence-based guidelines to base our algorithm upon," he said at a press conference at the annual meeting of AACE on May 13. "The evaluation of evidence will either support, refute, or lead to modification of that algorithm."

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Migraine, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Linked in Association Study
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:40 PM

Migraine headache and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be associated, researchers reported, with individuals reporting one in a large federal survey having greater likelihood of also reporting the other.

Among more than 25,000 American adults, migraine prevalence was reported to be 34% among those with CTS, compared with 16% in those without CTS.  Comparatively, CTS prevalence in participants with migraine was 8%, compared with 3% in those without migraine.

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Staying Fit May Delay Onset of High Cholesterol
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:29 PM

Men who keep fit may find they delay normal age-related increases in blood cholesterol levels by up to 15 years, a new study suggests.

It is common for cholesterol levels to rise with age and then decrease later in life, the study authors explained in background notes. Previous studies have shown that high cholesterol levels can be a risk factor for heart disease. Regular physical activity can lower this risk, the researchers said.

"Exercise and being fit helps keep arteries clear by lowering 'bad' [LDL] cholesterol and boosting 'good' [HDL] cholesterol," explained the study author.  It also reduces other risk factors for atherosclerosis [narrowed arteries] and blood clots, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and stress."  The long-term study ran from 1970 to 2006, and included just over 11,400 men, aged 20 to 90. Each took an exercise test on a treadmill to determine their baseline aerobic fitness level.

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'Thrifty' Metabolism Might Sabotage Weight Loss Efforts
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:23 PM

A new study confirms what many frustrated dieters already suspect: Your metabolism might make it tougher for you to lose weight than others.

"The results corroborate the idea that some people who are obese may have to work harder to lose weight due to metabolic differences," said lead author Dr. Martin Reinhardt, a postdoctoral fellow at the Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch of the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

"But biology is not destiny. Balanced diet and regular physical activity over a long period can be very effective for weight loss," he added in an institute news release.

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Kids With Concussion Symptoms Face More Academic Problems
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:21 PM

Students still experiencing concussion symptoms were more likely to report an impact on their performance in school compared with students who were no longer symptomatic, according to the results of a small survey.

Active concussion symptoms were associated with more problems in school and worse academic effects, regardless of when the concussion occurred.  The majority of symptomatic students (88%) reported at least one problem related to school (headaches, fatigue, and problems concentrating) and 77% reported diminished academic skills (difficulty taking notes, spending more time on homework, problems studying).

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New Thoughts on Evolution and Lower Back Pain
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:19 PM

Biological anthropologist Kimberly Plomp of Simon Fraser University has investigated the relationship between vertebral shape, upright locomotion, and human spinal health using two-dimensional shape analyses of chimpanzee, orangutan, and archaeological human vertebrae. “We found that some characteristics of human vertebrae differ in shape between those individuals who have a lesion called a Schmorl’s node—a small hernia that can occur in the cartilaginous disc between the vertebrae,” she said in a press release.

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Gardening: Pull Weeds...Not Your Back
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:16 PM

Now that spring is here, the weather is warming up and leaves are turning green, many people will spend more time outside planting bulbs, mowing the lawn and pulling weeds. Gardening can provide a great workout, but with all the bending, twisting, reaching and pulling, your body may not be ready for the challenge.A warm-up and cool-down period is as important in gardening as it is for any other physical activity. Performing simple stretches will help alleviate injuries, pain and stiffness.

Try this:

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Help Veterans Access Chiropractic Healthcare Services
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:13 PM

Senators Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) have introduced the Chiropractic Care Available to All Veterans Act. The bill would require the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to phase-in chiropractic at all major VA medical facilities over several years. You, too, can help ensure the essential services provided by doctors of chiropractic are available to the brave men and women who served our country by simply clicking the link below to urge your senators to cosponsor this bill!

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Magnesium Fights Diabetes
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:08 PM

Past studies have shown magnesium combats everything from heart health to osteoporosis, stroke, memory loss, and depression, but the latest research adds yet another benefit to magnesium’s greatest hits list — diabetes. A new analysis of studies reveals dietary magnesium intake combats diabetes and related conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, high blood pressure, and cholesterol.

The standard American diet fails to meet the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s recommended daily allowance of magnesium – of 400-420 milligrams per day for men; 310-320 for women — federal government studies show.  100 years ago we were getting 500 milligrams in our daily diet. Today we are lucky to get 200 milligrams, which is about half the very low RDA,” she said. “Most people think that their doctors would have warned them about this problem. But doctors are as ignorant as the public.”

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Standard Process Unveils Its First Mobile App
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:05 PM

Standard Process Inc. has released an app to help those who are cleansing their bodies through the Standard Process Purification Program. The 21-day purification program from Standard Process combines whole food eating with supplements, nutritious supplement shakes and light exercise to clear natural and environmental toxins from the body’s systems. The free Standard Process Purification app guides and motivates patients through pre-cleanse, the 21-day program and a transition into post-cleanse living.

“People use their phones for all kinds of support, so we knew there was an opportunity to create an app that would be really useful to patients using our Standard Process Purification Program,” said Tammi Geiger, director of marketing for Standard Process. “The Purification app is free and provides patients with tools to make it through the purification journey.”

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Squeeze Test in Finger/Toe Joints and Arthritis
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 06:52 PM

"Presently, no generally accepted test for early identification of arthritis (other than joint palpation) exists," researchers state.

"And clinicians should keep in mind the test characteristics of the squeeze test when performing this test in daily practice."

The squeeze test is not accurate enough to be used on its own to diagnose arthritis in either the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) or metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints, a cross-section cohort study has determined.


 

In this study, up to 50% of patients with swollen MCP or MTP joints at physical examination were missed by the squeeze test. So the squeeze test should be combined with other tests to achieve a good discriminative ability.

All patients underwent the "gold standard" physical joint examination by rheumatologists to confirm or rule out arthritis in either the MCP or MTP joints. Patients also underwent MRI to detect subclinical joint inflammation, and MRI exams were scored using the RAMRIS score.

"In total, 25% of patients had a positive squeeze test at MCP joints, 31% had a positive squeeze test at MTP joints, and 14% had a positive squeeze test at both the MCP and MTP joints," the authors observe.

They also note that a positive MCP squeeze test was associated with a higher MRI inflammation score than a negative test but this was not true for a positive MTP squeeze test that was not associated with a higher MRI inflammation score.


Source:  http://www.medpagetoday.com/Rheumatology/Arthritis/51444

 

 
Traumatic Brain Injuries & Whiplash Associated Disorders
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 06:49 PM
Traumatic Brain Injuries & Whiplash Associated Disorders: The Chiropractic Connection – Becoming the Expert in your Community
 
June 6, 2015 - 8:00am - 5:00pm Texas Chiropractic College 
Topics and Skills Discussed include:
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Inactive License Updates
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:00 AM

by Jennifer Hertsenberg, Director of Licensure, TBCE

  • A licensee can renew as inactive for up to twenty (20) years.

  • A licensee may return to active status after having been on an inactive status for five (5) years or LESS by taking and submitting proof of sixteen (16) approved hours of continuing education, including all required hours (TBCE and/or Medicare), with an active renewal form and a cashier’s check or money order for the renewal fee. The licensee can then return to inactive at the next renewal.

  • If a licensee has been inactive for more than five (5) years, the licensee can return to active status only upon successfully passing Part IV of the NBCE and the Board’s Texas Jurisprudence Examination.

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Treating Sleep Apnea May Ward Off Memory Decline
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

Breathing problems during sleep may be linked to early mental decline and Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests. But treating apnea with a continuous positive airway pressure machine can significantly delay the onset of cognitive problems.

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Valgus Knee Bracing Helps Pain in Knee OA
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

For patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), valgus knee bracing is associated with improvements in pain, according to a recent meta-analysis.  Six studies that compared changes in patient-reported pain and/or function in patients with medial knee OA were included in the analyses. 

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Most Football Concussions Happen in Practice
Written by Editor   
Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

High school and college football players suffer more concussions during practices than during games, according to a new study.  This is simply because there are more practices than games.  When the number of concussions is divided by the number of field appearances, the concussion rate is actually higher during games.

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Tylenol Is Ineffective For Treating Low Back Pain or Disability
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

Acetaminophen, also known as paracetamol (Tylenol) is widely recommended for the relief of back pain and the pain of knee and hip arthritis. But a systematic review of randomized trials has found that it works no better than a placebo.

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New Clinic Management Textbook
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

A new formal textbook on clinic management built for chiropractors has been recently published.  The entire anatomy of what creates a successful private clinic is reviewed in detail with clear examples on how to implement concepts in a real-world setting. Titled Concepts in Health Care Entrepreneurship the textbook includes a sample business plan, dialogue examples, case studies, and screenshots of important software programs.  This important resource represents 12 years of collaboration among chiropractors, clinic staff, and other professionals.

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Protect Your Aging Brain – Start With Exercise
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

There are things people can do to preserve their brain function as they age, a report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) suggests.

Changes in mental functions and capabilities are a part of aging and occur with everyone. The extent and nature of these changes vary widely and are gradual, and aging can have both positive and negative effects on cognition [thinking skills]. Wisdom and knowledge can increase with age, while memory and attention can decline.

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Visualization of Joint Cavitation
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible.

Results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. This is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration and provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

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80% of Health Systems will use Value-based Care Analytics by 2018
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

The transition to value-based care and improved outcomes may drive adoption of Population health and data analytics tools. Caring for populations with similar diseases will require healthcare leaders to use evidence-based medicine in treatment. Most are likely to draw from EHR data, patient demographics and aggregated EHR data and claims data.

Population health and data analytics tools are quickly joining EHRs as staples of hospitals' IT infrastructure.  A HealthLeaders Media survey found that more healthcare organizations will soon use data analytics as a tool for prediction and tracking population health. A little less than half of healthcare leaders currently use analytics to track population health, but that number will be nearly 80 percent by 2018, according to the survey.

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Standard Process Inc. Launches New Online Patient Ordering Platform
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

Standard Process Inc. is always looking for ways to help health care professionals grow their nutritional practices while improving the lives of their patients. The company’s newest health solution, Patient Direct™ by Standard Process, is an online patient ordering platform that makes it easy for health care professionals to offer Standard Process, Standard Process Veterinary Formulas and MediHerb® supplements to their patients in a convenient way.

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Are Bacterial Infections Causing Back Pain?
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

The results of several exciting and controversial studies on the use of antibiotics for treating low-back pain have recently been reported in the media. Other studies point to the presence of bacteria (propionibacterium acnes) in the disc and surrounding tissues in many patients with low-back pain. These studies show that as many as 40 percent of those with low-back pain may have a low-grade infection of the disc and end plates, causing the pain.

The findings of bacteria in tissues and the response to antibiotic therapy appear to be strongly associated with changes which are visualized on MRI.  They have long been considered an inflammatory response to mechanical injury and are six times more prevalent in people with chronic low-back pain than in the general population. 

If these preliminary studies are found to be accurate and substantiated by additional randomized controlled studies, it will be highly disruptive to the current models of care for low-back pain like the researchers who received the Nobel Prize in 2005 for discovering that the bacteria helicobacter pylori was responsible for peptic ulcers. Those who adamantly and publicly ridiculed the early research on helicobacter pylori were left looking a little foolish.

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New Brain Mapping Techniques Could Ease Chronic Pain
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Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 AM

Chronic pain, that lasts for months and years, afflicts one out of every five people.  People who suffer from chronic pain are sometimes met with skepticism because medical tests can’t conclusively prove the existence of such discomfort, but now new methods for mapping pain in the brain not only validate sufferers of chronic pain but might someday also lead to better treatment.  

Brain imaging from a University of Colorado scientist shows differences between long term and sudden pain. Sudden pain, such as touching a hot plate, triggers centers in the brain that govern fast action - like pulling your hand away. Pointing to MRI images, he explains that the pain signaling goes to many places in the brain at once.

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