Chiropractic
Use of Spinal Manipulation to Treat Acute On-Field Athletic Injury
Written by Editor   
Friday, August 26, 2016 12:00 AM

Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is a treatment modality that has been utilized for centuries.  There are numerous theoretical mechanisms of action for SMT. These theories are based around three major concepts: the biomechanical effects, the muscular reflexogenic effects and the neurophysiological effects. In addition, SMT also appears to have systemic effects on the body.

SMT have been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of numerous conditions; research has consistently demonstrated its effectiveness for neck and low back pain.  It has also been shown that SMT may have positive effects on pain and injury in the extremities. However, there is limited evidence of the use of SMT during a sporting event to treat an acute injury. The goal of this case study is to demonstrate the utilization of SMT during competition and to discuss the times when it may be appropriate.

This case describes the utilization of spinal manipulative therapy for an acute athletic injury during a Taekwondo competition. During the tournament, an athlete had a sudden, non-traumatic, ballistic movement of the cervical spine. This resulted in the patient having a locked cervical spine with limited active motion in all directions. The attending chiropractor assessed the athlete, and deemed manipulation was appropriate. After the manipulation, the athlete’s range of motion was returned and was able to finish the match. Spinal manipulation has multiple positive outcomes for an athlete with an acute injury including the increase of range of motion, decrease in pain and the relaxation of hypertonic muscles. However, there should be some caution when utilizing manipulation during an event.

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Why Can’t We Just Forget About Medicine and Just Do Our Own Thing? Just Don't Interfere
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 12:00 AM

For those who promote “Let’s forget organized medicine and just do our own thing,” what will you do about those who espouse the following policies?

Comment:  Sure organized medicine supports payment models for non-physician practitioners, as long as it doesn't interfere with medical residents.

ExcerptAMA will only support payment models for non-physician practitioners that do not interfere with graduate medical training.  Procedural training is a critical portion of resident education and the augmentation of patient care by non-physician practitioners should not interfere with a resident’s ability to achieve competence in the performance of required procedures.

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Chiropractic Identity:A Neurological, Professional, and Political Assessment
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 12:00 AM

From its origins in 1895 with DD Palmer’s original focus on magnetic healing, chiropractic identity has been beset with the challenging task of keeping up not only with clinical and scientific observation but with political trade winds involving public perception and the marketplace of health care.  At present, the chiropractic profession continues to be underrepresented in most discussions of health care delivery, a situation in which the greater clarification of chiropractic’s identity and more practitioner consensus may help to alleviate this problem.

Originally, DD Palmer viewed the body from a more mechanical viewpoint, but he paid particular attention to the nerves.  It was from this origin that the popular but often misinterpreted concept grew that doctors of chiropractic dealt with “bones out of place,” the locus of such derangements being the spine. Leading to the modern notion that doctors of chiropractic were managing primarily musculoskeletal problems with emphasis upon back pain.  Yet, numerous distinguishing characteristics, including providing a model of holistic, preventive medicine and embracing a concept of neurological imbalance, have prevailed.   

The purpose of the article reported is to propose a focused assessment of the identity of chiropractic and its profession, triangulating multiple viewpoints converging upon various aspects and definitions of neurology, manual medicine, and alternative or mainstream medicine.

Distinguishing characteristics of doctors of chiropractic include the following:

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Why Can’t We Just Forget About Medicine and Just Do Our Own Thing? Comparable
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, August 16, 2016 12:00 AM

For those who promote “Let’s forget organized medicine and just do our own thing,” what will you do about those who espouse the following policies?

Comment:  "AMA strongly encourages [that in] health insurance plans and managed care organizations that provide disease management, non-physicians should be certified or licensed as physician assistants or nurse practitioners, or have at least a comparable level of training."  

Do you think your doctorate degree, with or without additional specialized training, would be considered "at least comparable" by organized medicine?  If not, what are you doing about it?

ExcerptAMA strongly encourages [that in] health insurance plans and managed care organizations that provide disease management, non-physicians who function as care coordinators in disease management programs should be certified or licensed as physician assistants or nurse practitioners, or have at least a comparable level of training.

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Why Can’t We Just Forget About Medicine and Just Do Our Own Thing? Physician-led ONLY
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, August 09, 2016 12:00 AM

For those who promote “Let’s forget organized medicine and just do our own thing,” what will you do about those who espouse the following policies?

Comment:  Organized medicine supports PAs, and NPs practicing in physician-led teams prescribing therapeutic shoes and inserts.  Do you think organized medicine would support independent DCs prescribing such?

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