Chiropractic
Head Posture and Cervical Spine Movement in Children With and Without Pediatric Headache
Written by Editor   
Friday, September 16, 2016 12:00 AM

Pediatric headache is an increasingly reported phenomenon. Headache is the most frequently reported pain in children, with an even sex distribution up to the age of 12, after which more females than males suffer. Cognitive, behavioral, and emotional factors have been shown to play important roles in generating headache in children. In addition, physical factors, such as schoolwork, increased forward head posture, and prolonged static postures of the head have also been shown to play a role in triggering headache. 

Pediatric headache prevalence rates are 50% during school years, increasing during adolescence to 80%. Studies have shown that children with more severe headache report lower quality in life, in general, while early onset headache can be predictive of ongoing problems during adolescence and adult life, indicating the importance of diagnosis and management.  

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Children Presenting to Chiropractors in Norway
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:00 AM

The idea of chiropractors treating children is controversial to some, yet many parents seek chiropractic care for their children. Part one of this study aimed to document the profile of all pediatric patients consulting Norwegian chiropractors in 2013 using National Health Insurance data (NHI) with regards to age, gender and primary complaints.

Musculoskeletal problems constituted the most common presenting complaint for children and adolescents presenting to Norwegian chiropractors. A sizable proportion of children seemed to be adversely affected by their complaints in terms of low mood and limitations of daily activities. Chronic presentations were not uncommon. 

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Is Puberty a Risk Factor For Back Pain?
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:00 AM

Back pain is a common condition that starts early in life and seems to increase markedly during puberty. According to two recent systematic literature reviews, the lifetime prevalence increases between the ages of 7 and 12 (on average from 1% to 17%) to reach the adult level around the age of 20. In relation to low back pain, it appears that puberty is the time for a rapid increase.

The time of puberty is the transition period from childhood to adulthood and over only a few years, both body and soul will undergo many changes. The most apparent morphological differences are increased height and a change in body composition. It has been proposed that these may impact back pain. The growth spurt, defined as an average gain of 10 cm per year, could be considered a particularly vulnerable period due to sudden mechanical loading changes on the spine. Girls start puberty earlier than boys, which may explain why they report back pain earlier than boys.

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Why Can’t We Just Forget About Medicine and Just Do Our Own Thing? Declare Yourself Subordinate
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 12:00 AM

For those who promote “Let’s forget organized medicine and just do our own thing,” what will you do about those who espouse the following policies?

Comment:  Organized medicine wants every doctor to have a name badge in the hospital.  "Anyone in a hospital environment who has direct contact with a patient who presents himself or herself to the patient as a “doctor,” and who is not a “physician” according to the AMA definition must specifically and simultaneously declare themselves a “non-physician” and define the nature of their doctorate degree."

Of course AMA physicians are exempt and if the protocol just happens to spill into the public domain so that chiropractors are perpetually portrayed as second-class providers...who will take offense on behalf of chiropractic?

Excerpt :  AMA requests that The Joint Commission develop and implement standards for an identification system for all hospital facility staff who have direct contact with patients which would require that an identification badge be worn which indicates the individual’s name and credentials as appropriate (i.e., MD, DO, RN, LPN, DC, DPM, DDS, etc);  and requests that The Joint Commission develop and implement new standards that require anyone in a hospital environment who has direct contact with a patient who presents himself or herself to the patient as a “doctor,” and who is not a “physician” according to the AMA definition must specifically and simultaneously declare themselves a “non-physician” and define the nature of their doctorate degree.

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Chiropractic Services in the Department of Veterans Affairs
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to analyze national trends and key features of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA’s) chiropractic service delivery and chiropractic provider workforce since their initial inception.  Use of chiropractic services and the chiropractic workforce in VA have grown substantially over more than a decade since their introduction.

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