Mom's Vitamin E Levels Tied to Child's Risk for Asthma
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 07:07 AM

News bite:  Vitamin E plays a part in children's wheezing, but there are eight isotopes of vitamin E, all which have displayed differing effects on health in human studies. Clinicians should be aware that what is currently labeled in our foods and supplements as vitamin E or alpha-tocopherol is actually any of eight different isoforms, and alpha-tocopherol may not actually be the dominant isoform being provided.


Children born to mothers with low vitamin E levels were more likely to suffer from wheeze, and to require asthma medication at 2 years, researchers said.

Analysis of more than 600 children found that those with wheezing had mothers with significantly lower postpartum concentrations of the vitamin E isoform alpha-tocopherol compared with those who did not. Increasing maternal concentrations of alpha-tocopherol had a protective association with the risk of early life wheezing and the receipt of asthma medications.  However, increasing concentrations of maternal gamma-tocopherol, another vitamin E isoform, modified this protective benefit.

The researchers followed the children and their mothers for the first 2 years of the child’s life and used validated questionnaires to ascertain one of the three outcomes: children who wheezed in the past 12 months, received asthma medication in the past 12 months, or ever received an asthma diagnosis from a clinician.

The results serve as an important reminder that there are eight isotopes of vitamin E, all which have displayed differing effects on health in human studies and animal experiments. “Clinicians should be made aware that what is currently labeled in our foods and supplements as vitamin E or alpha-tocopherol is actually any of eight different isoforms, and alpha-tocopherol may not actually be the dominant isoform being provided.”

The oils that we consume are the main sources of tocopherol in our diet, and they can widely vary in terms of their tocopherol isoforms. For example, sunflower and safflower oil provide predominantly alpha-tocopherol as their isoform of vitamin E, while corn and soy oil provide predominantly gamma-tocopherol. Other sources of vitamin E include nuts, fish, avocados, leafy greens, and sweet potatoes.


Source: https://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/AAAAI/63602