Manipulation of Dysfunctional Spinal Joints Affects Sensorimotor Integration in the Prefrontal Cortex
Written by Editor   
Thursday, January 19, 2017 02:00 PM

News Bite: The medical establishment has recently been seeking to remove from the chiropractic profession its access to the neurology of the human body. This research may shed some light as to why.  Over the past decade, there has been a growing body of evidence to suggest that neural plastic changes occur following chiropractic spinal manipulation.  With this study, researchers set out to explore which brain sources are responsible.  The study demonstrates that a single session of spinal manipulation of dysfunctional segments in subclinical pain patients alters somatosensory processing at the cortical level, particularly within the prefrontal cortex.


The medical establishment has recently been seeking to remove from the chiropractic profession its access to the neurology of the human body. This research may shed some light as to why.  

Over the past decade, there has been a growing body of evidence to suggest that neural plastic changes occur following chiropractic spinal manipulation. Investigators have suggested that neuroplastic brain changes occur in structures such as the primary sensory cortex, primary motor cortex, prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. However, the evidence for the involvement of these brain structures is indirect. 

Although EEG measures neuronal activity directly (with high millisecond time resolution), it has poor spatial resolution, making it difficult to know exactly where in the brain the changes are occurring. Studies with only a few recording EEG electrodes allow investigation of evoked potential amplitudes and latencies and have shown changes in the N30 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) amplitudes following spinal manipulation, but they do not allow identification of changes in the individual areas of the brain generating the neural activity that underlies the evoked signals. 

In recent decades, efforts have been made to improve the spatial resolution of EEG. These methods have successfully been used in a number of SEP studies.  With this study, researchers set out to utilize brain electrical source analysis to explore which brain sources are responsible for changes in N30 amplitude following a single session of spinal manipulation. They hypothesized that a single session of chiropractic spinal manipulation would reduce the N30 amplitude and that this amplitude reduction would be attributed to decreased strength of one or more of the underlying brain sources.  Nineteen subclinical pain volunteers attended two experimental sessions, SM and control in random order. SEPs from 62-channel EEG cap were recorded following median nerve stimulation 

SM decreased the N30 amplitude while no differences were seen following the control intervention. Brain source modeling revealed a 4-source model but only the prefrontal source showed reduced activity following SM.

The research concludes that a single session of spinal manipulation of dysfunctional segments in subclinical pain patients alters somatosensory processing at the cortical level, particularly within the prefrontal cortex.


Source:  http://chiro.org/wordpress/2017/01/manipulation-of-dysfunctional-spinal-joints-affects-sensorimotor-integration-in-the-prefrontal-cortex/