"Uncivil Physician" Pleads Guilty to "Wild West" Tactics
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, November 22, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite: Some claim that Texas is reverting to the “wild west,” yet a New York physician demonstrates that the “civil” northeast is often yet untamed. A New York osteopathic cardiologist sought to grow his practice by 1) setting his competitor’s office on fire, 2) desiring to “dynamite his office”, 3) paying to have him beaten, 4) putting down payments for having him killed.  The “caring physician” had practiced with the “target” for nearly two decades when they split into separate businesses.  

Police searching the New York “mansion” of the physician found about 100 weapons, some of them illegal. The “compassionate cardiologist” pleaded guilty not only to arson and conspiracy to commit an assault but also to one count of illegal possession of a firearm and one count of the criminal sale of a prescription for a controlled substance. State prosecutors expect that a New York Supreme Court Justice will sentence him to five years in prison.


An osteopathic cardiologist on Long Island, New York, had a business problem with a colleague-turned-rival.  The physician pleaded guilty in a New York State court last month to setting fire to the another physician’s office in Great Neck, New York, and conspiring to have him beaten up by a hireling.

Prosecutors said that a police investigation of illegal oxycodone prescriptions written by the cardiologist unexpectedly uncovered a murder-for-hire plot targeting an unnamed fellow cardiologist with whom the “caring physician” had practiced for 20 years. He vacillated between killing and merely assaulting the other physician before settling on the latter by the time of his arrest on April 14, 2015.

The ill will stemmed from an unspecified “professional dispute." He wanted to put him out of business so he could get his business a district attorney reported.

When police searched the physician’s mansion in Sands Points, New York, they found roughly 100 weapons, including rifles with illegal, high-capacity magazines, knives, and a grenade. Many of them were stored in a secret room behind a switch-activated moving bookshelf.

The “compassionate cardiologist” practiced with the other cardiologist for nearly two decades and after the breakup, he originally wanted to dynamite the other physician's office building, but switched to arson, according to prosecutors. The two men he hired for the job were only partly successful. The building's sprinkler system put out the gasoline-fuelled fire before it had caused too much damage.

His next move was to attempt bodily harm. He offered an undercover detective $5000 to assault the other physician and, for a time, dangled $20,000 for a murder, going so far as to make down payments, prosecutors said.

The physician pleaded guilty not only to arson and conspiracy to commit an assault but also to one count of illegal possession of a firearm and one count of the criminal sale of a prescription for a controlled substance. State prosecutors said the plea deal satisfied the original 77-count indictment against him.

His sentencing date is December 16. A New York Supreme Court Justice intends to sentence him to 5 years in prison, according to prosecutors.


Source:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/871586