Nutritional Supplementation with Calcium Safe From CVD Standpoint
Written by Editor   
Sunday, November 20, 2016 12:00 AM

News Bite:  Dietary and supplemental calcium are safe for cardiovascular health when consumed in recommended amounts of up to 2500 mg/day.  Dietary calcium should be preferred over supplements because of increase in kidney stone formation.


A new joint clinical guideline from the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC) states that dietary and supplemental calcium are safe for cardiovascular health when consumed in recommended amounts. The recommendation applies to calcium consumed either alone or with vitamin D that does not exceed the National Academy of Medicine’s tolerable upper intake limit of 2000 to 2500 mg/day.  Discontinuation of supplemental calcium for safety reasons is not necessary and may be harmful to bone health when intake from food is suboptimal.

A 2010 meta-analysis concluded that calcium increased the risk for myocardial infarction and stroke, but a 2011 meta-analysis concluded that calcium had no statistically significant effects on coronary heart disease events or mortality.

An important point for clinicians is that dietary calcium should be recommended over supplements. Calcium supplements can increase kidney stone formation, where dietary calcium does not.


Source:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/870890