The Course of Low Back Pain in a General Population
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Monday, December 21, 2015 07:49 AM

This study concludes Low back pain should not be considered transient and therefore neglected, since the condition rarely seems to be self-limiting but merely presents with periodic attacks and temporary remissions. 


To investigate the course of low back pain (LBP) in a general population over 5 years, a prospective population-based survey was conducted in 1991, 1992, and 1996, in Denmark.

Two thousand people aged 30 to 50 years, representative of the Danish population, were surveyed with the main outcome measure  being the number of days with low back pain participants experienced during the past year.

More than one-third of people who experienced LBP in the previous year did so for greater than 30 days.  Forty percent of people with LBP with pain greater than 30 days at baseline remained in that group at both 1 and 5 years later. People with LBP in year 0 were 4 times more likely to have LBP in year 1, and 2 times more likely to be affected in year 5.

Low back pain should not be considered transient and therefore neglected, since the condition rarely seems to be self-limiting but merely presents with periodic attacks and temporary remissions. On the other hand, chronicity as defined solely by the duration of symptoms should not be considered chronic.


Source:  http://chiro.org/wordpress/2015/12/the-course-of-low-back-pain-in-a-general-population/