Migraine, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Linked in Association Study
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Thursday, May 28, 2015 07:40 PM

Migraine headache and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be associated, researchers reported, with individuals reporting one in a large federal survey having greater likelihood of also reporting the other.

Among more than 25,000 American adults, migraine prevalence was reported to be 34% among those with CTS, compared with 16% in those without CTS.  Comparatively, CTS prevalence in participants with migraine was 8%, compared with 3% in those without migraine.

CTS is the most common compression neuropathy, the authors noted, and some recent studies have suggested that some migraine headaches may be associated with nerve compression within the head and neck. It's possible that the two seemingly unrelated conditions have a common associated comorbidity or common genetic factor, they said, though additional studies are needed to better define the relationship.

CTS was associated with older age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and cigarette smoking, and was less common in Hispanics and Asians, Sammer and colleagues indicated. Migraine was associated with younger age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and cigarette smoking, and was less common in Asians.

Investigators reviewed data from the Adult Core module of the 2010 National Health Interview Survey, an annual, in-person health survey of U.S. civilians. CTS was defined as answering yes to two questions: "Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have a condition affecting the wrist and hand called carpal tunnel syndrome?" and "During the past 12 months have you had carpal tunnel syndrome?" Migraine was defined as answering yes to the question, "During the past 3 months, did you have severe headache or migraine?"

Of 25,880 respondents, 952 (3.7%) reported CTS diagnosis and 4,212 (16.3%) said they had migraine headache. Increased body mass index and diabetes were associated with both CTS and migraine. Current and former smoking status were associated with an increased odds of CTS, though only current smoking status was associated with an increased odds of migraine.


Source:  http://www.medpagetoday.com/Neurology/Migraines/51548