Systolic Pressure May Signal Risk in Young
Tuesday, March 03, 2015 06:39 AM

Isolated systolic hypertension in young and middle-age adults was associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular causes later in life, according to a study done over 3 decades.

Men in the study with systolic blood pressure (BP) levels of 140 mmHg or higher and diastolic BP below 90 had a 28% increased risk for death from coronary heart disease compared with men with normal BP.  Women with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) had a more than twofold greater death risk than women with optimal BP.

The findings provide strong evidence that ISH is a clinically meaningful condition in young and middle-age adults and not just pseudo or 'white-coat’ hypertension.

"It is not well supported by science, but there has been a belief by many that elevated systolic and not diastolic blood pressure in younger adults is benign.”  ISH is defined as a systolic BP of 140 mmHg or greater with a diastolic BP of less than 90 mmHg. It is common in the elderly, but relatively uncommon in younger and middle-age adults, the researchers wrote.

The overall prevalence of ISH among adults in their 20s and 30s has more than doubled in recent decades, from 0.7% between 1988 and 1994 to 1.6% between 1999 and 2004, but there is still a great deal of uncertainly about the clinical consequences of ISH in younger adults.


Source:  http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension/49735